Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • intransitive v. To become more lenient, compassionate, or forgiving. See Synonyms at yield.
  • transitive v. Obsolete To cause to slacken or abate.
  • transitive v. Obsolete To cause to soften in attitude or temper.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Stay; stop; delay.
  • v. To become less severe or intense; to become less hard, harsh, or cruel; to soften in temper; to become more mild and tender; to feel compassion.
  • v. To slacken; to abate.
  • v. To lessen, make less severe or fast.
  • v. To become less rigid or hard; to soften; to yield; to dissolve; to melt; to deliquesce.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • intransitive v. To become less rigid or hard; to yield; to dissolve; to melt; to deliquesce.
  • intransitive v. To become less severe or intense; to become less hard, harsh, cruel, or the like; to soften in temper; to become more mild and tender; to feel compassion.
  • transitive v. To slacken; to abate.
  • transitive v. To soften; to dissolve.
  • transitive v. To mollify ; to cause to be less harsh or severe.
  • n. Stay; stop; delay.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To slacken; stay.
  • To soften in substance; lose compactness; become less rigid or hard.
  • To deliquesce; dissolve; melt; fade away.
  • To become less severe or intense; relax.
  • To become less harsh, cruel, or obdurate; soften in temper; become more mild and tender; give way; yield; comply; feel compassion.
  • To slacken; remit; stay; a bate.
  • To soften; mollify; dissolve.
  • n. Remission; stay.
  • n. Relenting.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. give in, as to influence or pressure

Etymologies

Middle English relenten, to melt, from Anglo-Norman relenter, from relent, damp : Latin re-, re- + Latin lentus, sticky, slow.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Latin re- + lentus. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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