Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To put into order; arrange or fix definitely as desired.
  • transitive v. To put firmly into a desired position or place; establish.
  • transitive v. To establish as a resident or residents: settled her family in Ohio.
  • transitive v. To establish residence in; colonize: Pioneers settled the West.
  • transitive v. To establish in a residence, business, or profession.
  • transitive v. To restore calmness or comfort to.
  • transitive v. To cause to sink, become compact, or come to rest.
  • transitive v. To cause (a liquid) to become clear by forming a sediment.
  • transitive v. To subdue or make orderly.
  • transitive v. To establish on a permanent basis; stabilize.
  • transitive v. To make compensation for (a claim).
  • transitive v. To pay (a debt).
  • transitive v. To conclude (a dispute, for example) by a final decision.
  • transitive v. To decide (a lawsuit) by mutual agreement of the involved parties without court action.
  • transitive v. Law To secure or assign (property or title) by legal action.
  • intransitive v. To discontinue moving and come to rest in one place.
  • intransitive v. To move downward; sink or descend, especially gradually: Darkness settled over the fields. Dust settled in the road.
  • intransitive v. To become clear by the sinking of suspended particles. Used of liquids.
  • intransitive v. To be separated from a solution or mixture as a sediment.
  • intransitive v. To become compact by sinking, as sediment when stirred up.
  • intransitive v. To establish one's residence: settled in Canada.
  • intransitive v. To become established or localized: The cold settled in my chest.
  • intransitive v. To reach a decision; determine: We finally settled on a solution to the problem. See Synonyms at decide.
  • intransitive v. To come to an agreement, especially to resolve a lawsuit out of court.
  • intransitive v. To provide compensation for a claim.
  • intransitive v. To pay a debt.
  • n. A long wooden bench with a high back, often including storage space beneath the seat.
  • settle down To begin living a stable and orderly life: He settled down as a farmer with a family.
  • settle down To become calm or composed.
  • settle for To accept in spite of incomplete satisfaction: had to settle for a lower wage than the one requested.
  • idiom settle (one's) stomach To relieve one's indigestion or nausea.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A seat of any kind.
  • n. A long bench, often with a high back and arms, with storage space underneath for linen.
  • n. A place made lower than the rest; a wide step or platform lower than some other part.
  • v. To place in a fixed or permanent condition; to make firm, steady, or stable; to establish; to fix; esp., to establish in life; to fix in business, in a home, or the like.
  • v. To establish in the pastoral office; to ordain or install as pastor or rector of a church, society, or parish; as, to settle a minister.
  • v. To cause to be no longer in a disturbed condition; to render quiet; to still; to calm; to compose.
  • v. To clear of dregs and impurities by causing them to sink; to render pure or clear; -- said of a liquid; as, to settle coffee, or the grounds of coffee.
  • v. To restore or bring to a smooth, dry, or passable condition; -- said of the ground, of roads, and the like;as, clear weather settles the roads.
  • v. To cause to sink; to lower; to depress; hence, also, to render close or compact; as, to settle the contents of a barrel or bag by shaking it.
  • v. To determine, as something which is exposed to doubt or question; to free from uncertainty or wavering; to make sure, firm, or constant; to establish; to compose; to quiet; as, to settle the mind when agitated; to settle questions of law; to settle the succession to a throne; to settle an allowance.
  • v. To adjust, as something in discussion; to make up; to compose; to pacify; as, to settle a quarrel.
  • v. To adjust, as accounts; to liquidate; to balance; as, to settle an account.
  • v. To pay; as, to settle a bill. --Abbott.
  • v. To plant with inhabitants; to colonize; to people; as, the French first settled Canada; the Puritans settled New England; Plymouth was settled in 1620.
  • v. To become fixed or permanent; to become stationary; to establish one's self or itself; to assume a lasting form, condition, direction, or the like, in place of a temporary or changing state.
  • v. To fix one's residence; to establish a dwelling place or home; as, the Saxons who settled in Britain.
  • v. To enter into the married state, or the state of a householder.
  • v. To be established in an employment or profession; as, to settle in the practice of law.
  • v. To become firm, dry, and hard, as the ground after the effects of rain or frost have disappeared; as, the roads settled late in the spring.
  • v. To become clear after being turbid or obscure; to clarify by depositing matter held in suspension; as, the weather settled; wine settles by standing.
  • v. To sink to the bottom; to fall to the bottom, as dregs of a liquid, or the sediment of a reservoir.
  • v. To sink gradually to a lower level; to subside, as the foundation of a house, etc.
  • v. To become calm; to cease from agitation.
  • v. To adjust differences or accounts; to come to an agreement; as, he has settled with his creditors.
  • v. To make a jointure for a wife.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A seat of any kind.
  • n. A bench; especially, a bench with a high back.
  • n. A place made lower than the rest; a wide step or platform lower than some other part.
  • transitive v. To place in a fixed or permanent condition; to make firm, steady, or stable; to establish; to fix; esp., to establish in life; to fix in business, in a home, or the like.
  • transitive v. To establish in the pastoral office; to ordain or install as pastor or rector of a church, society, or parish.
  • transitive v. To cause to be no longer in a disturbed condition; to render quiet; to still; to calm; to compose.
  • transitive v. To clear of dregs and impurities by causing them to sink; to render pure or clear; -- said of a liquid.
  • transitive v. To restore or bring to a smooth, dry, or passable condition; -- said of the ground, of roads, and the like.
  • transitive v. To cause to sink; to lower; to depress; hence, also, to render close or compact.
  • transitive v. To determine, as something which is exposed to doubt or question; to free from unscertainty or wavering; to make sure, firm, or constant; to establish; to compose; to quiet.
  • transitive v. To adjust, as something in discussion; to make up; to compose; to pacify.
  • transitive v. To adjust, as accounts; to liquidate; to balance.
  • transitive v. Hence, to pay.
  • transitive v. To plant with inhabitants; to colonize; to people
  • intransitive v. To become fixed or permanent; to become stationary; to establish one's self or itself; to assume a lasting form, condition, direction, or the like, in place of a temporary or changing state.
  • intransitive v. To fix one's residence; to establish a dwelling place or home.
  • intransitive v. To enter into the married state, or the state of a householder.
  • intransitive v. To be established in an employment or profession.
  • intransitive v. To become firm, dry, and hard, as the ground after the effects of rain or frost have disappeared.
  • intransitive v. To become clear after being turbid or obscure; to clarify by depositing matter held in suspension.
  • intransitive v. To sink to the bottom; to fall to the bottom, as dregs of a liquid, or the sediment of a reserveir.
  • intransitive v. To sink gradually to a lower level; to subside, as the foundation of a house, etc.
  • intransitive v. To become calm; to cease from agitation.
  • intransitive v. To adjust differences or accounts; to come to an agreement.
  • intransitive v. To make a jointure for a wife.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A seat; a bench; a ledge.
  • n. Specifically, a seat longer than a chair; a bench with a high back and arms, made to accommodate two or more persons.
  • n. A seat fixed or placed at the foot of a bedstead.
  • n. A part of a platform lower than another part.
  • n. One of the successive platforms or stages leading up from the floor to the great altar of the Jewish Temple.
  • To place in a fixed or permanent position or condition; confirm; establish, as for residence or business.
  • To establish or fix, as in any way of life, or in any business, office, or charge: as, to settle a young man in a trade or profession; to settle a daughter by marriage; to settle a clergyman in a parish.
  • To set or fix, as in purpose or intention.
  • To adjust; put in position; cause to sit properly or firmly: as, to settle one's cloak in the wind; to settle one's feet in the stirrups.
  • To change from a disturbed or troubled state to one of tranquillity, repose, or security; quiet; still; hence, to calm the agitation of; compose: as, to settle the mind when disturbed or agitated.
  • To change from a turbid or muddy condition to one of clearness; clear of dregs; clarify.
  • To cause to sink to the bottom, as sediment.
  • To render compact, firm, or solid; hence, to bring to a dry, passable condition: as, the fine weather will settle the roads.
  • To plant with inhabitants; colonize; people: as, the Puritans settled New England.
  • To devolve, make over, or secure by formal or legal process or act: as, to settle an annuity on a person.
  • Synonyms To fix, institute, ordain.
  • To become set or fixed: as sume a continuing, abiding, or lasting position, form, or condition; become stationary, from a temporary or changing state; stagnate.
  • To establish a residence; take up permanent habitation or abode.
  • To be established in a way of life; quit an irregular and desultory for a methodical life; be established in an employment or profession; especially, to enter the married state or the state of a householder, or to be ordained or in stalled over a church or congregation: as, to settle in life: often with down.
  • To become clear; purify itself; become clarified, as a liquid.
  • To sink down more or less gradually; subside; descend: often with on or upon.
  • Specifically
  • To fall to the bottom, as sediment.
  • To sink, as the foundations or floors of a building; become lowered, as by the yielding of earth or timbers be neath: as, the house has settled.
  • To become compact and hard by drying: as, the roads settle after rain or the melting of snow.
  • To alight, as a bird on a bough or on the ground.
  • To become calm; cease to be agitated.
  • To resolve; determine; decide; fix: as, they have not yet settled on a house.
  • To make a jointure for a wife.
  • To reconcile.
  • To determine: decide, as something in doubt or debate; bring to a conclusion; con clude: confirm; free from uncertainty or wavering: as, to settle a dispute; to settle a vexatious question; to settle one's mind.
  • To fix: appoint; set, as a date or day.
  • To set in order; regulate; dispose of.
  • To reduce to order or good behavior; give a quietus to: as, he was inclined to be insolent, but I soon settled him.
  • To liquidate: balance; pay: as, to settle an account, claim, or score.
  • To become reconciled; be at peace.
  • To adjust differences, claims, or accounts; come to an agreement: as, he has settled with his creditors.
  • To pay one's bill; discharge a claim or demand.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. settle into a position, usually on a surface or ground
  • v. establish or develop as a residence
  • v. get one's revenge for a wrong or an injury
  • v. become clear by the sinking of particles
  • v. end a legal dispute by arriving at a settlement
  • v. accept despite lack of complete satisfaction
  • n. a long wooden bench with a back
  • v. dispose of; make a financial settlement
  • v. become resolved, fixed, established, or quiet
  • v. become settled or established and stable in one's residence or life style
  • v. go under,
  • v. sink down or precipitate
  • v. settle conclusively; come to terms
  • v. cause to become clear by forming a sediment (of liquids)
  • v. bring to an end; settle conclusively
  • v. take up residence and become established
  • v. come to terms
  • v. come as if by falling
  • v. fix firmly
  • v. form a community
  • v. make final; put the last touches on; put into final form
  • v. come to rest
  • v. arrange or fix in the desired order

Etymologies

Middle English setlen, to seat, from Old English setlan, from setl, seat; see sed- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Old English setl, from Germanic *setla-, representing Proto-Indo-European *sed-lo-, from *sed- (“sit”). Cognate with German Sessel, Dutch zetel; and with Greek ἑλλά, Latin sedo, Russian седло. The verb (Old English setlan) developed from the noun. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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