straighten out love

Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To make straight.
  • v. To correct or rectify.
  • v. To eliminate confusion from or concerning.
  • v. To correct; to stop doing something wrong.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. make free from confusion or ambiguity; make clear
  • v. extricate from entanglement
  • v. make straight
  • v. change for the better
  • v. settle or put right
  • v. put (things or places) in order

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Their notion was for "a short sharp punch to straighten out First Panzer Army's position south of the Donetz,"

    Barbarossa

  • He still drank, but he'd apparently been frightened enough at Raiford to straighten out just a bit.

    Darkly Dreaming Dexter

  • So, for example, the dead James Chaffin Sr. had to straighten out unfinished business; the Rumanian phantom was piqued over the fate of his corpse.

    Experiencing the Next World Now

  • Our sand-hill days were very pleasant, outside of the seldom changed diet, namely the mush, which we had to sometimes eat with molasses; the treatment of Gilbert, and the attempt to straighten out our unruly wools.

    My Life in the South

  • The highway began to straighten out as it reached the bottom.

    I Don’t Understand ?

  • On one occasion an old lady, by the name of Janney Cuteron, attempted to straighten out my wool with one of those Jim-crows; as she hitched the teeth of the instrument in my unyielding wool with her great masculine hand, of course I was jerked flat on my back.

    My Life in the South

  • But before this was done, however, the unsuccessful attempt was made to straighten out our unruly wools with some small cards, or Jim-crows as we called them.

    My Life in the South

  • General Samford made an honest attempt to straighten out the Washington National Sightings, but the cards were stacked against him.

    Space Ships of the Visitors

  • Martin Luther King had returned to Memphis in April to try to straighten out the sanitation-worker strike that had escalated into violence, the disturbance possibly started by undercover police infiltrators.

    1968

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