Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A narrow strip, as of leather, used for binding or lashing.
  • n. A whip of plaited leather or cord.
  • n. A sandal held on the foot by a strip that fits between the first and second toes and is connected to a strap usually passing over the top or around the sides of the foot.
  • n. A garment for the lower body that exposes the buttocks, consisting of a narrow strip of fabric that passes between the thighs supported by a waistband.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A strip of leather.
  • n. An item of footwear, usually of rubber, secured by two straps which join to pass between the big toe and its neighbour.
  • n. An undergarment or swimwear consisting of very narrow strips designed to cover just the genitals and nothing more.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A strap of leather; especially, one used for fastening anything.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A long narrow strip of leather; a narrow strap, used as a fastening, a halter, reins, the lash of a whip, the latchet of a shoe, and in many other ways. See cut under snow-shoe.
  • To provide, fit, or fasten with a thong.
  • To strike with a thong, or with a similar implement, as the lash of a whip.
  • To rope; stretch out into viscous threads or filaments.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. underpants resembling a G-string; worn by women especially under very tight pants
  • n. a backless sandal held to the foot by a thong between the big toe and the second toe
  • n. a thin strip of leather; often used to lash things together
  • n. minimal clothing worn by stripteasers; a narrow strip of fabric that covers the pubic area, passes between the thighs, and is supported by a waistband
  • n. leather strip that forms the flexible part of a whip

Etymologies

Middle English, from Old English thwong.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English thong, thwong, thwang, from Old English þwong, þwang, þweng, þwæng ("thong, band, strap, cord, strip of leather; phylactery"), from Proto-Germanic *þwangiz, *þwanguz (“coercion, constraint, band, clamp, strap”), from Proto-Indo-European *twenk- (“to squeeze, press, pressure”). Cognate with Scots thwang, thwayng, thang ("thong"), Middle Low German dwenge ("clamp, jaws, steel-trap"), German Zwinge ("vise, clamp"), Norwegian dialectal tveng ("shoestrap, shoelace"), Icelandic þvengur ("strap, thong, latchet"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

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  • Sandalous!

    March 21, 2010

  • I, too, like this as a verb.

    June 26, 2008

  • *hiding from the inevitable earworm*

    June 26, 2008

  • It *is* fun to say, as evidenced by the infamous "Thong Song".

    June 26, 2008

  • Heyyy...I like this word as a verb! (As a noun, I could do without it.)

    June 26, 2008

  • Wayne thongs Jayne an amorphous wallet thing
    (he is into leathercraft) and, guess what? -
    they both think for five minutes each morning.

    - Peter Reading, It's a Small World, from Fiction, 1979

    June 26, 2008

  • See also fartbreaker, if you dare.

    June 18, 2008