Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Triple: "treble reason for loving as well as working while it is day” ( George Eliot).
  • adj. Music Relating to or having the highest part, voice, or range.
  • adj. High-pitched; shrill.
  • n. Music The highest part, voice, instrument, or range.
  • n. Music A singer or player that performs this part.
  • n. A high, shrill sound or voice.
  • transitive v. To make or become triple.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Threefold, triple.
  • adj. Pertaining to the highest singing voice or part in harmonized music; soprano.
  • adj. High in pitch; shrill.
  • n. The highest singing voice (especially as for a boy) or part in musical composition.
  • n. A person or instrument having a treble voice or pitch; a boy soprano.
  • n. Any high-pitched or shrill voice or sound.
  • n. A threefold quantity or number; something having three parts or having been tripled.
  • n. Any of the narrow areas enclosed by the two central circles on a dartboard, worth three times the usual value of the segment.
  • n. Three victories, awards etc.
  • v. To multiply by three; to make into three parts, layers, or thrice the amount.
  • v. To make a shrill or high-pitched noise.
  • v. To become multiplied by three or increased threefold.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Threefold; triple.
  • adj.
  • adj. Acute; sharp.
  • adj. Playing or singing the highest part or most acute sounds; playing or singing the treble.
  • adv. Trebly; triply.
  • n. The highest of the four principal parts in music; the part usually sung by boys or women; soprano.
  • transitive v. To make thrice as much; to make threefold.
  • transitive v. To utter in a treble key; to whine.
  • intransitive v. To become threefold.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Threefold; triple.
  • In music, pertaining to the voice or the voice-part called treble or soprano; high in pitch; in harmony, occupying the upper place: as, a treble voice; a treble violin. See II.
  • n. In music: Same as soprano (which see).
  • n. A singer with a soprano or treble voice, or an instrument that takes the upper part in concerted music.
  • n. Also triplex.
  • n. In short whist, a game which counts three points to the winners, their adversaries not having scored.
  • To make thrice as much; make threefold; multiply by three; triple.
  • To utter in a high or treble tone; hence, to whine.
  • To become threefold.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. three times as great or many
  • v. sing treble
  • adj. having more than one decidedly dissimilar aspects or qualities
  • adj. having three units or components or elements
  • v. increase threefold
  • n. the pitch range of the highest female voice
  • adj. having or denoting a high range

Etymologies

Middle English, from Old French, from Medieval Latin triplum, from Latin, neuter of triplus, triple; see triple.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Old French treble, from Latin triplus. (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

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  • so stretched out huge in length the Arch-Fiend lay
    chained on the burning lake, nor ever thence
    had ris'n or heaved his head, but that the will
    & high permission of all-ruling heaven
    left him at large to his own dark designs,
    that with reiterated crimes he might
    heap on himself damnation, while he sought
    evil to others, & enraged might see
    how all malice served but to bring forth
    infinite goodness, grace & mercy shown
    on man seduced, but on himself
    treble confusion, wrath & vengence poured.

    -Milton, paradise lost

    I think here it's being used to mean "threefold"

    June 20, 2008

  • A duodene of birdnotes chirruped bright treble answer under sensitive hands.
    Joyce, Ulysses, 11

    January 7, 2007