Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The International System unit of electric potential and electromotive force, equal to the difference of electric potential between two points on a conducting wire carrying a constant current of one ampere when the power dissipated between the points is one watt. See Table at measurement.
  • n. Sports A circular movement executed by a horse in manège.
  • n. Sports A sudden movement made in avoiding a thrust in fencing.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. In the International System of Units, the derived unit of electrical potential and electromotive force (voltage); the potential difference across a conductor when a current of one ampere uses one watt of power. Symbol: V

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A circular tread; a gait by which a horse going sideways round a center makes two concentric tracks.
  • n. A sudden movement to avoid a thrust.
  • n. The unit of electro-motive force; -- defined by the International Electrical Congress in 1893 and by United States Statute as, that electro-motive force which steadily applied to a conductor whose resistance is one ohm will produce a current of one ampère. It is practically equivalent to 1000/1434 the electro-motive force of a standard Clark's cell at a temperature of 15° C.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In the manège, a round or cirecular tread; a gait of two treads made by a horse going sidewise round a center, with the head turned outward.
  • n. In fencing, a sudden movement or leap to avoid a thrust.
  • n. The practical unit of electromotive force.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a unit of potential equal to the potential difference between two points on a conductor carrying a current of 1 ampere when the power dissipated between the two points is 1 watt; equivalent to the potential difference across a resistance of 1 ohm when 1 ampere of current flows through it

Etymologies

After Count Alessandro Volta.
French volte, from Italian volta, turn, from voltare, to turn, leap; see vault2.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Named after the Italian physicist Alessandro Volta. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • I was reading this morning about converting Prius 'to "plug in" versions and about companies plans to make factory plug in models (chevy volt is an example).

    What's so green about electric cars?

  • I may run back down tomorrow and take my pumpgun and trap, mine cane be operated my the one shooting, I made it to work off 12 volt from the four wheeler.

    The Best Day of All?

  • The electrical unit known as the volt was named in his honor.

    Volta, Alessandro Giuseppe Antonio Anastasio

  • Let's compare the two drinks and see what's creating all the confusion among the so called ignorant consumers who obviously are believed not to be able to tell the difference between the word volt and vault.

    Energy Fiend

  • ET’s points on the electrical service requirements are valid points and apparently in some parts of Mexico even in the more heavily populated areas 220 volt is not available.

    Mexico Moving practices

  • The technology for the volt has been available for too long.

    Wonk Room » GM Shows Off Their New 230mpg Chevy Volt

  • Primary electromotive force and voltage drop have the same unit which is called volt - V in honour of the Italian physicist Alessandro Volta (1745 - 1827).

    2. Fundamental Quantities of Electrical Engineering

  • It must be remembered that the volt is the practical unit of electro-motive force.

    Electricity for Boys

  • It will be priced far less than the 4-seat wonder called the volt with viridian joule colors ..... perhaps as much as 50% less.

    Autoblog Green

  • So it seems like the volt will be a niche product and will most likely not be that well accepted by the general public.

    undefined

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • "volt" in Hungarian means: was / were

    August 7, 2012