Gildedmuse has adopted , looked up 25950 words, created 23 lists, listed 5977 words, written 13 comments, added 432 tags, and loved 1420 words.

Comments by Gildedmuse

  • An arrogant individual, one who treats others with contempt; literally "one who forces others to give him oral sex"

    April 3, 2017

  • Rock-Happy

    1940s Slang. Crazed. From military petsonal stuck on an island too long

    April 3, 2017

  • Adding the name of aircraft separately.

    A-1 Skyraider - "SPAD", "Sandy"

    A-7 Corsair II - "SLUF" (Short Little Ugly you-know-what)

    A-10 Thunderbolt II - "Warthog" or just "Hog"

    B-1 Lancer - "Bone" from B-One

    B-2 Spirit - I've never heard a nickname for it.

    B-52 Stratofortress - "BUFF", "Bongo", "Buffasaurus"

    C-5 Galaxy - "Fat Albert" or "FRED" (Effing Ridiculous Economic Disaster)

    C-130 Hercules - "Herc"

    C-141 Starlifter - "Star lizard"

    C-17 Globemaster III - If it has a nickname I don't know it.

    F-100 Super Sabre - "Hun", "Lieutenant Killer"

    F-101 Voodoo - "One o Wonder"

    F-102 Delta Dagger - "Deuce"

    F-104 Starfighter - "Missile with a man in it", "Widowmaker", "Flying Coffin"

    F-105 Thunderchief - "Thud", "Triple Threat" (bomb you, strafe you, fall on you)

    F-106 Delta Dart - "Six"

    F-4 Phantom II - "Rhino", "Double Ugly"

    F-4G Wild Weasel - "Weasel"

    F-16 Fighting Falcon - "Viper", "Electric Jet", "Lawn Dart"

    F-15E Strike Eagle - "Mud Hen"

    EF-111 Raven - "Spark Vark"

    KC-135 Stratotanker - Just "tanker". A water-injected KC-135A might also be called a "Steam Jet"

    KC-10 Extender - The plane never really had a nickname that I know of. We called the crews "Gucci Boys" because their plane was so fancy.

    O-2 Skymaster - "Duck", "Suck and Blow" (one engine in front, one in back)

    SR-71 - "Habu" (a type of poisonous snake), "Lead Sled"

    T-37 - "Tweety Bird", "Tweet", "Squeak" (its engine had a very high pitched sound)

    T-38 Talon - "38"

    U-2 "Dragon Lady"

    May 3, 2016

  • Doctiloquent

    Adjective

    (rare) Speaking learnedly.

    Etymology

    Coined from Latin docti + loquens, from genitive of doceo (“I teach”) + present participle of loquor (“I speak”). Compare eloquent.

    April 6, 2016

  • Dulciloquent (dul-cil-o-quent) adjective

    Speaking sweetly or in a sweet and pleasing manner. Pleasant speech to the ear. Talking in a charming or agreeable way.

    April 6, 2016

  • From The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows:

    n. the desire to care less about things—to loosen your grip on your life, to stop glancing behind you every few steps, afraid that someone will snatch it from you before you reach the end zone—rather to hold your life loosely and playfully, like a volleyball, keeping it in the air, with only quick fleeting interventions, bouncing freely in the hands of trusted friends, always in play.

    March 30, 2016

  • From The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows:

    n. the desire to care less about things—to loosen your grip on your life, to stop glancing behind you every few steps, afraid that someone will snatch it from you before you reach the end zone—rather to hold your life loosely and playfully, like a volleyball, keeping it in the air, with only quick fleeting interventions, bouncing freely in the hands of trusted friends, always in play.

    March 30, 2016

  • From The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows

    n. the subtle but persistent feeling of being out of place, as maladapted to your surroundings as a seal on a beach—lumbering, clumsy, easily distracted, huddled in the company of other misfits, unable to recognize the ambient roar of your intended habitat, in which you’d be fluidly, brilliantly, effortlessly at home.

    The definition: The subtle yet nagging feeling of being out of place, not fitting in, knowing that the place you belong is not where you are.

    March 30, 2016

  • From The Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows:

    n. a conversation in which everyone is talking but nobody is listening, simply overlaying disconnected words like a game of Scrabble, with each player borrowing bits of other anecdotes as a way to increase their own score, until we all run out of things to say.

    March 30, 2016

  • From The Dictionary Of Obscure Sorrows:

    n. the unsettling awareness of your own heartbeat, whose tenuous muscular throbbing feels less like a metronome than a nervous ditty your heart is tapping to itself, the kind that people compulsively hum or sing while walking in complete darkness, as if to casually remind the outside world, I’m here, I’m here, I’m here.

    March 30, 2016

  • From The Dictionary Of Obscure Sorrows:

    n. the awareness of how little of the world you’ll experience

    The definition: This is defined as the frustration of being stuck in just one body at any time, unable to experience more than one thing or be in more than one place, knowing that there are a million things you won’t be able to do before you die.

    March 30, 2016

  • From The Dictionary Of Obscure Sorrows:

    n. a hypothetical conversation that you compulsively play out in your head—a crisp analysis, a cathartic dialogue, a devastating comeback—which serves as a kind of psychological batting cage where you can connect more deeply with people than in the small ball of everyday life, which is a frustratingly cautious game of change-up pitches, sacrifice bunts, and intentional walks.

    The definition: The imaginary and often lively conversation that you carry out in your head between yourself and someone else.

    March 30, 2016

  • A curse tablet or binding spell from the Latin tabulae defixiones meaning cursed tablet. Defixiones (singular: defixio) could be found throughout the ancient Grecco-Roman empire and were made from a variety of materials the most common being lead but also papyrus, ceramic, stone, animal hide, and in rare cases silver and gold. They were used to invoke the power of gods, house/nature spirits, and even the dead to preform a variety of spells.

    There were many different uses for these tables beyond simple "bad luck" curses Spells used repeatedly often had their own distinguishing term. Some common ones include:
    -- Katadesmos: bind up, retain; inhibit by means of a spell, binding by magic knots; spells, enchantments.
    -- Phármakon: drug, medicine, remedy, poison; potion, charm, spell.
    -- Venenum: poison, drug, medical potion, charm, seduction; probably originally, "love potion".
    -- Devotio: apotheosis, consecration; fealty, allegiance, deference, piety, devotion, zeal; curse, imprecation, execration; sorcery, enchantment. magical formula, incantation, spell.
    -- Carmina: song, poem, prayer, prophecy, incantation, charm, ritual, magic.


    A defixio would be prepared by carving/writing onto the material - anything from a full verse, to a short prayer, to simply the subject/object's name - and binding/ting the sheets around small personal items such as stolen clothes, hair, or objects thought to aid in magic. Typically a nail would be hammered through the tablet to finish the spell, at which point it would be left somewhere safe and secret including burying them in the graves of the dead so that no one else could stumble upon it and break the curse.

    July 13, 2015

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  • I like your lists. :-)

    April 19, 2017