Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A distinctively sharp taste, flavor, or odor, as that of orange juice. See Synonyms at taste.
  • n. A distinctive quality that adds piquancy.
  • n. A trace, hint, or smattering.
  • n. A sharp point, tongue, or prong.
  • n. A projection by which a tool, such as a chisel or knife, is attached to its handle or stock. Also called shank.
  • n. A surgeonfish.
  • transitive v. To furnish with a tang.
  • transitive v. To give a tang to.
  • n. A loud ringing sound; a twang.
  • transitive v. To twang or cause to twang; ring.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. tongue
  • n. A refreshingly sharp aroma or flavor
  • n. A strong or offensive taste; especially, a taste of something extraneous to the thing itself; as, wine or cider has a tang of the cask
  • n. A sharp, specific flavor or tinge
  • n. A projecting part of an object by means of which it is secured to a handle, or to some other part; anything resembling a tongue in form or position
  • n. The part of a knife, fork, file, or other small instrument, which is inserted into the handle
  • n. The projecting part of the breech of a musket barrel, by which the barrel is secured to the stock
  • n. The part of a sword blade to which the handle is fastened
  • n. The tongue of a buckle
  • n. A group of saltwater fish from the Acanthuridae family, especially the Zebrasoma genus, also known as the surgeonfish.
  • n. A sharp, twanging sound; an unpleasant tone; a twang
  • v. To make a ringing sound; to ring.
  • n. A coarse blackish seaweed (Fuscus nodosus)
  • n. The vagina; intercourse with a woman

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A coarse blackish seaweed (Fuscus nodosus).
  • n. A strong or offensive taste; especially, a taste of something extraneous to the thing itself.
  • n. Fig.: A sharp, specific flavor or tinge. Cf. Tang a twang.
  • n. A projecting part of an object by means of which it is secured to a handle, or to some other part; anything resembling a tongue in form or position.
  • n. The part of a knife, fork, file, or other small instrument, which is inserted into the handle.
  • n. The projecting part of the breech of a musket barrel, by which the barrel is secured to the stock.
  • n. The part of a sword blade to which the handle is fastened.
  • n. The tongue of a buckle.
  • n. A sharp, twanging sound; an unpleasant tone; a twang.
  • n. A dynasty in Chinese history, from a. d. 618 to 905, distinguished by the founding of the Imperial Academy (the Hanlin), by the invention of printing, and as marking a golden age of literature.
  • intransitive v. To make a ringing sound; to ring.
  • transitive v. To cause to ring or sound loudly; to ring.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To furnish with a tang, or with something resembling one.
  • To tie.
  • To sting.
  • To ring; twang; cause to sound loudly: as, to tang a bell; also, to utter loudly, or with a twang.
  • To affect in some way by a twanging sound: as, to tang bees (to strike two pieces of metal together so as, by producing a loud sound, to induce a swarm of bees to settle).
  • To ring; twang; sound loudly.
  • n.
  • n. A fish belonging to the family Teuthididæ, Teuthis hepatus, of the West Indian fauna.
  • n. A point; a projection; especially, a long and slender projecting strip, tongue, or prong, forming part of an object and serving to hold or secure it to another.
  • n. The sting of an insect or a reptile.
  • n. A dagger.
  • n. In the papier-mâché process of stereotyping, a piece of thin sheet-iron or cardboard used to overlap the tail-end of the matrix, and prevent the molten metal from flowing under the mold in the casting-box. Also called tail-piece.
  • n. A strong taste or flavor; particularly, a taste of something extraneous to the thing itself.
  • n. A specific flavor or quality; a characteristic property; a distinctive tinge, taint, or tincture.
  • n. A kind of seaweed; tangle. See tangle.
  • n. Sound; tone; ring; especially, a twang, or sharp sound.
  • n. Same as tenrec.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the taste experience when a savoury condiment is taken into the mouth
  • n. a common rockweed used in preparing kelp and as manure
  • n. a tart spicy quality
  • n. any of various coarse seaweeds
  • n. any of various kelps especially of the genus Laminaria
  • n. brown algae seaweed with serrated edges
  • n. the imperial dynasty of China from 618 to 907

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Middle English tange, of Scandinavian origin; akin to Old Norse tangi, point, sting.
Imitative.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English tang ("serpent's tongue", "extension of blade"), from Old Norse tangi ("pointed metal tool"), perhaps related to tunga ("tongue"). But see also Old Dutch tanger ("sharp", "tart", "pinching")

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

imitative

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Probably of Scandinavian origin; compare Danish tang ("seaweed"), Swedish tång, Icelandic þang

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From poontang by shortening

Examples

  • With an 870 and almost any other shotgun, the end grain of the stock where it joins the action at the tang is a usual trouble spot for oil soaking.

    Gun storage, small space

  • Yes | No | Report from bigjake wrote 11 weeks 6 days ago not crazy about the safety on my old stevens 5000, only because of its postion on the tang is too close to the stock, and I have large hands, Im always checking the safety to make sure it hasnt been brushed ahead by hitting my hand.

    The Best (and Worst) Shotgun Safeties

  • It comes out to be closer to the consistency of buttermilk than yogurt does and still has a little of that tang from the vinegar.

    Apple Cinnamon Muffins | Baking Bites

  • It had a great flavor, with a nice butteriness and a very subtle tang from the long first rise.

    Baking Bites » Print » No-Knead White Bread

  • Some find the tang of Pinkberry excessive, even aggressive; others say that yogurt without tang is just low-fat ice cream.

    Frozen Yogurt's Hot, Hot, Hot

  • Cynthia -- There's no need to work up the courage as it's both sweet and rich with nary a hint of the usual goat's milk strong tang (instead, the tang is rather subtle at best).

    A Mexican sweet treat | Homesick Texan

  • It was bright and fruity like sorbet, and creamy like ice cream, but with a tang from the yogurt.

    Archive 2008-07-01

  • The pancakes are super fluffy, and the tang from the buttermilk gives them a zip.

    Sunday Brunch Buttermilk Blueberry Pancakes

  • In truth, it is one of the simplest cakes to make: light and citrusy, with only the addition of the crunchy black poppy seeds and a slight tang from the lemon.

    Archive 2007-02-01

  • Flaky, with a beautiful custard, a very light sprinkle of sugar crystals, plenty of tang from the pluot and a just a little honeyed sweetness from the fig. This danish alone will have me going back.

    Seattle Bon Vivant:

Comments

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  • "With wood spars, the conventional method used to attach the shroud and forestay is to use TANGS. Tangs are short metal straps usually with a crimp or bend to splay them out from the mast when in position."

    https://www.glen-l.com/free-book/rigging-small-sailboats-3.html

    December 22, 2016

  • a point or sting OR a seaweed OR a fish

    February 8, 2013

  • See baldyhead.

    April 23, 2009

  • Tang is a sugared, fruit-flavored, non-carbonated soft drink from the USA. The original orange flavored Tang was formulated by General Foods Corporation in 1957 and first marketed (in powdered form) in 1959.

    It was initially intended as a breakfast drink, but sales were poor until NASA began using it on Gemini flights in 1965, and that use was heavily advertised.

    _Wikipedia

    February 3, 2008