abigail has looked up 6540 words, created 6 lists, listed 1583 words, written 99 comments, added 3359 tags, and loved 16 words.

Comments by abigail

  • Really? You think? (and you're right :-)

    May 4, 2011

  • My daughter sometimes uses this account to make lists too.

    May 4, 2011

  • This profile is not active; the account is not being used. For my active account, go to http://www.wordnik.com/people/abigail

    May 4, 2011

  • These expensive car accessories from the 1980s do what the name implies: the inner portion of the rim continues to spin on roller bearings after the wheels they are attached to have stopped.

    April 20, 2011

  • The Rocky Horror Picture Show began as a musical stage play (1973, Richard O’Brien) and was adapted into a movie (1975). It's a rock music parody of science fiction and "B" grade horror films. The movie opened in the USA on September 26, 1975. When it was switched to a midnight run at the Waverly Theatre in Greenwich Village in New York City, as of April 1, 1976, it began to attract a cult following. Moviegoers themselves became part of the show: booing the villains, cheering the heroes, talking back to the characters, attending in costume and bringing props. The show+audience experience was never exactly the same two nights running, and some repeat fans attended hundreds and even thousands of times.

    April 14, 2011

  • Given its staying power, it's hard to decide whether the Barbie doll is a fad or a phenomenon :-) But it definitely went through the breakout "wow, I've got to have one!" phase that is characteristic of fads after it was introduced in 1959.

    April 14, 2011

  • The game of pogs originated in the 1920s on the Hawaiian island of Maui. It became unexpectedly popular in the continental United States in the 1990s. Pogs is played with small picture disks (originally, with milk caps). To begin the game, each player takes the same number of pogs. At the start of a turn, each player makes a stack of at least four pogs, with their faces down. On each turn, one player takes a slammer and strikes a stack of pogs with it, getting to keep the pogs that land face up. At the end of the game, the player with the most pogs is the winner.

    April 14, 2011

  • To get a "distressed" look, clothing makers washed denim jeans for three to four hours at a time with pumice stones soaked in bleach. This created worn-looking spots and streaks.

    April 14, 2011

  • Franz Anton Mesmer first practiced mesmerism in France in the 1770s, where it was quite popular for a while. In the 1830s, England experienced a revival of the fad, which moved to American in the late 1830s and early 1840s.

    April 14, 2011

  • The Hoppity Hop was the north American version of a bouncy ball that could be ridden by people. Trademarked by the Sun company, the Hoppity Hop was targeted at both children and adults. In Britain, a similar product was known as the space hopper.

    April 13, 2011

  • A "fade" or "faded" men's hairstyle is one that starts short and becomes progressively longer. In a hi-top fade the hair on the sides is cut off or kept very short and the hair on the top of the head is very long, similar to a flattop. In a low fade style, hair on the top is kept shorter.

    April 13, 2011

  • The thankfully short-lived fad of goldfish swallowing began when Harvard Freshman Lothrop Withington, Jr. took the dare of eating a live goldfish, in 1939.

    April 13, 2011

  • Hairdressing emerged as a profession during the reign of Louis XVI of France in part because his mistress, Madame de Pompadour, was fond of dressing her hair in unusual ways. A fantastic diorama wig could take hours to create, as hair was pulled, pomaded, powdered and piled with decorations.

    April 13, 2011

  • "Day by day, in every way, I am getting better and better." Most people would recognize this sentence, but few people nowadays would associate it with French psychologist Emile Coué. Coué was a big believer in the power of thoughts and words to influence mental and physical outcomes - something more often referred to now as "positive thinking."

    April 13, 2011

  • A bodysuit was a stretchy leotard-like garment, often with long sleeves, with snaps at the crotch. You pulled it on over your head and snapped yourself into it. Simplicity patterns of the 1970s paired them with shorts or hip-huggers.

    April 12, 2011

  • In 2008 (Smith v. Wal-Mart Stores, Inc.) and 2009 (Loufrani vs. Wal-Mart), American judges determined that the smiley face is "ubiquitous" in American culture, and not a "distinctive" mark, and therefore cannot be trademarked in the U.S.

    April 12, 2011

  • In 1983, the Swatch Group, Ltd., of Switzerland reconceptualized the watch as an inexpensive fashion accessory and introduced the "Swatch watch". It came in hundreds of colors, styles, and even scents, and was wildly popular in the 1980s -- people even wore several Swatch watches at once.

    April 12, 2011

  • An anti-perm, or antiperm, is a hair-straightening technique. African-Americans used these heavily between the 1920s and 1950s. More natural styles like the Afro became popular for black hair in the 1960s, at the same time that performers like Joan Baez and Mary Travers made long-blonde-straight hair a popular fad with their audiences. Worth seeing: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d7tlu3RYz64

    April 12, 2011

  • An anti-perm, or antiperm, is a hair-straightening technique. African-Americans used these heavily between the 1920s and 1950s. More natural styles like the Afro became popular for black hair in the 1960s, at the same time that performers like Joan Baez and Mary Travers made long-blonde-straight hair a popular fad with their audiences. Worth seeing: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d7tlu3RYz64

    April 12, 2011

  • An anti-perm, or antiperm, is a hair-straightening technique. African-Americans used these heavily between the 1920s and 1950s. More natural styles like the Afro became popular for black hair in the 1960s, at the same time that performers like Joan Baez and Mary Travers made long-blonde-straight hair a popular fad with their audiences. Worth seeing: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d7tlu3RYz64

    April 12, 2011

  • An anti-perm, or antiperm, is a hair-straightening technique. African-Americans used these heavily between the 1920s and 1950s. More natural styles like the Afro became popular for black hair in the 1960s, at the same time that performers like Joan Baez and Mary Travers made long-blonde-straight hair a popular fad with their audiences. Worth seeing: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d7tlu3RYz64

    April 12, 2011

  • Inventor Don Kracke started selling eye-popping stick-on flower decals a few months after 1967’s Summer of Love in San Francisco.
    By the end of 1968, 90 million of his Rickie Tickie Stickies had been sold.

    April 12, 2011

  • A Japanese toy called a Tako was introduced into the United States by Ken Hakuta as the "Wacky WallWalker". Made of sticky plastic, and shaped like an octopus, the toy would "walk" its way down a wall if thrown against it.

    April 12, 2011

  • A novelty item, X-Ray Spex were marketed as allowing people to see through anything, including clothing. In reality, they were made of layers of cheap cardboard with a feather inside: if someone looked through them at their hand, the tracery of the feather appeared superimposed on the hand, reminiscent of bones.

    April 12, 2011

  • The yellow "Livestrong" wristband was developed by cancer survivor and cyclist Lance Armstrong in the summer of 2004 to raise money for the Lance Armstrong Foundation. The wristbands were manufactured and donated by Nike and sold for $1 each. By March 2005, over 58 million wristbands had been sold.

    April 12, 2011

  • Jelly bracelets or gel bracelets are rubbery bands which can be worn one at a time or hooked together. They became a fad when a bracelet was created by champion bicycle racer and cancer survivor Lance Armstrong to help raise money for cancer research. The success of his "Livestrong" yellow wristbands inspired both other non-profits, and for-profit companies, to sell colored wristbands.

    April 12, 2011

  • Jelly shoes or jellies are shoes made of PVC plastic. This material allows them to be made in a wide variety of colors and styles. Jelly shoes made by the Brazil-based company Grendene Shoes were introduced into the U.S. in the early 1980s.

    April 12, 2011

  • Scully is a game played on a sidewalk using a chalk-drawn course make up of numbered boxes. Each player needs a scully chip (generally a bottle cap.) Players shoot their chips sequentially from box to box, and the first player to flick his or her chip from the beginning to the end of the course and back again, wins.

    April 12, 2011

  • Ape hanger handlebars rise high up so that the rider must reach up to use them. This style of bicycle handlebar became popular in the 1960s on wheelie bicycles that imitated the appearance of chopper motorcycles.

    April 12, 2011

  • Brands of chopper bikes experienced an astronomical jump in popularity because of the 1969 movie "Easy Rider." The movie features two chopper motorcycles and manufacturers created a myriad of variations. Schwinn’s largest competitor, the English brand Raleigh, trademarked "Chopper" as the name of their most popular chopper bike.

    April 12, 2011

  • Brands of chopper bikes experienced an astronomical jump in popularity because of the 1969 movie "Easy Rider." The movie features two chopper motorcycles and manufacturers created a myriad of variations. Schwinn’s largest competitor, the English brand Raleigh, even trademarked "Chopper" as the name of their most popular chopper bike.

    April 12, 2011

  • Alice blue" is a pale shade of blue which was a favorite of Theodore Roosevelt's daughter Alice Roosevelt Longworth. Her frequent wearing of the color set off a fad, and inspired the hit song "Alice Blue Gown".

    April 11, 2011

  • Vogue Doll Company Inc. was founded by Jennie Graves in the mid 1920s. Vogue began to produce the composition Ginny doll in the 1950s. The name "Ginny" was first used in 1950 on one model of the 8 inch Vogue doll, but by 1951, all Vogue 8 inch dolls were referred to as "Ginny". All authentic Ginny dolls are marked as Vogue or Ginny on their heads or bodies, and almost all genuine Ginny clothes bear the Vogue label.

    April 11, 2011

  • In the game "Johnny on a Pony" or "Buck Buck", one player or set of players climbs on another's back. The object of the game may either be for the base player to guess a number from the player on top, or for the climbers to collapse the base player(s).

    April 11, 2011

  • In the game "Johnny on a Pony" or "Buck Buck", one player or set of players climbs on another's back. The object of the game may either be for the base player to guess a number from the player on top, or for the climbers to collapse the base player(s).

    April 11, 2011

  • Bobby socks, or bobby sox, are a type of sock that was especially fashionable in the 1940s and 1950s. They are characteristically ankle-length and frilly, and worn by girls often as part of a school uniform. They were popular to wear with saddle shoes, loafers or Oxfords.
    _Wikipedia

    April 11, 2011

  • A Chinese card game, qaio pai was inspired by the American card game of bridge. It became extremely popular in the 1970's.

    April 11, 2011

  • The first troll doll was created in 1959 by Danish fisherman and woodcutter Thomas Dam. Troll dolls became quite popular in Europe and the U.S.A. during the early 1960s. The fad reappeared in the United States starting in 1982 when EFS Marketing, Inc. began to market troll dolls in the U.S.A. under an exclusive distributorship contract with Dam Things, Denmark. Under this contract, EFS was given the right to distribute the Dam doll under the trademark "Norfin." However, each Norfin was required to contain the following statement: "This model is designed and copyrighted by Dam Things, Denmark."

    April 7, 2011

  • The original troll doll was developed by Thomas Dam, of Denmark, and trademarked by Dam Things, Denmark. It became popular in Europe and the United States in the 1960s. The fad reappeared in the United States starting in 1982 when EFS Marketing, Inc. began to market troll dolls in the U.S.A. under an exclusive distributorship contract with Dam Things, Denmark. Under this contract, EFS was given the right to distribute the Dam doll under the trademark "Norfin." However, each Norfin was required to contain the following statement: "This model is designed and copyrighted by Dam Things, Denmark."

    April 7, 2011

  • "CB Radio", or the Citizens' Band radio service, began in the United States in 1945 and was regulated by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). It allocated a radio band for personal communication by citizens. In the late 1960's and 1970's, handheld technology for CB radios improved and use of CB radios became a popular fad.

    April 7, 2011

  • "Alice blue" is a pale shade of blue which was a favorite of Theodore Roosevelt's daughter Alice Roosevelt Longworth. Her frequent wearing of the color set off a fad, and inspired the hit song "Alice Blue Gown".

    April 7, 2011

  • The "Hesitation Waltz" was a waltz style popularized by Vernon and Irene Castle around 1910. A "hesitation" is basically a halt on the standing foot during the full waltz measure, with the moving foot suspended in the air or slowly dragged.

    April 7, 2011

  • The Castle Walk is a dance originated and made famous by Vernon and Irene Castle in New York in 1912. In this dance, the man continually goes forward and the lady backward. The principal figures in the Castle Walk are the walk forward, walk backward, turning to the right and left, and going in circles.

    April 7, 2011

  • The catch phrase "Gee Dad, It's A Wurlitzer" was Wurlitzer's advertising slogan in the mid 1950s. Wurlitzer made pipe organs for home, church, and theatre use, but this famous slogan was most often used to advertise their Model 1600 and 1700 Series jukeboxes.

    April 6, 2011

  • On Wednesday, April 02, 1930, the 2-in-1 Shinola-Bixby Corporation of New York and Indianapolis received a U.S. federal trademark registration for Shinola, a type of wax shoe polish.

    April 5, 2011

  • Puffa began because founder Penny Rogers wanted something really warm and comfortable to wear for riding. She made the first Puffa jackets in her kitchen and sold them at Tidworth Horse Trials. While the typical Puffa customer still may be a regular rider or parent of riders, the brand has broken into the popular and celebrity markets as well. An authentic Puffa jacket has distinctive quilting lines and detailing which make it instantly recognizable.

    April 5, 2011

  • According to Real User Corp., people should be more successful in recognizing a Passface than in recalling a password -- and use of a graphical Passface would be a more secure form of verification.

    April 5, 2011

  • Ozalid was federally registered in the United States as a trademark for light-sensitive copying and photographic papers, on February 5, 1929. The term "ozalid process" has genericized to mean a process of printing positive images on paper from patterns on film or other translucent media.

    April 5, 2011

  • Iwan Serrurier obtained his first Moviola-related patent on April 8, 1919, for a "Picture Projecting Apparatus". The initial Moviola was a home movie projector enclosed in a Victrola-like cabinet, which could be used for viewing "dailies" in movie studios. Serrurier went on to develop a direct viewing device which revolutionized the work of the studios' cutting rooms.

    April 2, 2011

  • The first countertop mixer for use in home food preparation was developed by the Hobart Company around 1918. Its trademark name, "KitchenAid", supposedly came from the comment of a company wife who was testing a prototype model.

    April 2, 2011

  • Ivar Jepson patented the "Sunbeam Mixmaster" in 1928. The Sunbeam Mixmaster was a stand mixer which home cooks could use to mix wet and dry ingredients to an even consistency, to make cakes, bread or biscuits. Priced economically, Mixmasters dominated the market for may years, and "mixmaster" became a generic term for a household mixer.

    April 2, 2011

  • Metal-Flake is a trademarked brand name for automobile paint.

    April 2, 2011

  • Methaqualone was introduced into the pharmaceutical market as a sleeping pill, under the trade names "Mandrax" and "Quaalude". It was removed from the legal market in 1971 because of its potential for abuse and addiction.

    April 2, 2011

  • The Spaulding Leather Co. trademarked the term "Loafer" for its moccasin-style slip-on shoe, first made in New Hampshire, in 1933.

    April 1, 2011

  • Canon Felix Kir (1876-1968), the mayor of Dijon, popularized the drinking of “blanc cassis” (white wine with a touch of black currant syrup) by offering it to official visitors. In 1952, he gave the Damidot family, owners of the Lejay-Lagoutte company in Dijon, the right to use his name commercially to sell their drinks. Later he gave the same rights to other companies. After various legal battles, in 1992, the Lejay-Lagoutte company was recognized as the sole owner of the “Un Kir” trademark.

    April 1, 2011

  • Kasha is the brand name of a soft napped fabric blending wool and hair. Vicuña hair was originally used, but the species was declared endangered in the 1970's, and has since been protected.

    April 1, 2011

  • Lawrence Patterson imported European table soccer to the U.S. in 1962, calling his soccer table game "Foosball Match", and trademarking the term "FOOSBALL" in Canada and the U.S.A.

    March 31, 2011

  • You can own an authentic pair of American-made Tokyo trousers — while helping to rebuild the country that inspired them. Betabrand is sending 50% of the proceeds from the first batch of Japants directly to the city of Ishinomaki, which is accepting donations to fund local relief efforts for the 2011 tsunami.

    March 31, 2011

  • In 1921, a London based company formed to market personal organization systems by mail order. In 1930 they registered the trademark "Filofax" for their organizer, a loose-leaf diary and notebook. The company's organizer became a status symbol and its name became a household term in the U.K.

    March 31, 2011

  • Most "Mace" sold today by Mace Security International uses pepper spray rather than tear gas, as CN gas is illegal in many countries.

    March 31, 2011

  • In 1895 Louis Comfort Tiffany patented "favrile glass", a type of hand blown-glass which was notable for its surface iridescence and brilliant color. The iridescent effect was obtained by mixing different colors of glass while hot.

    March 31, 2011

  • The Eskimo Pie, a tasty combination of ice cream wrapped in chocolate, was invented by Christian Kent Nelson. Nelson claimed that he experimented with different ways to adhere melted chocolate to bricks of ice cream after a boy in his candy store was unable to decide whether to spend his money on ice cream or a chocolate bar. Nelson initially sold his invention under the name "I-Scream Bars," but in 1921 joined with local chocolate producer Russell C. Stover to mass-produce them under the trademark "Eskimo Pie".

    March 31, 2011

  • Combivir is a pharmaceutical treatment for HIV infection which combines a fixed dose of two antiretroviral drugs, lamivudine (also called 3TC, with the brand name Epivir) and zidovudine (also called AZT, with the brand name Retrovir).

    March 30, 2011

  • The Callanetics exercise programme was created by Callan Pinckney in the early 1980s. It uses frequent small muscular movements to improve muscle tone.

    March 30, 2011

  • In 1966 Ella Helfrich used a Bundt pan to bake her Tunnel of Fudge Cake and win the 17th Pillsbury Bake-off. In response, Pillsbury received more than 200,000 requests from people who wanted to purchase a Bundt pan.

    March 29, 2011

  • BITNET was a data transmission network founded in 1981 by Ira H. Fuchs (City University of New York) and Greydon Freeman (Yale University). Its goal was to link North American academic institutions and other information networks.

    March 29, 2011

  • Bel Paese is a creamy, light, cow's milk cheese with a milky aroma. Originally produced in Melzo, a small village near Milan in the Lombardy region, Bel Paese cheese is now made in both Italy and the United States, where it is trademarked.

    March 29, 2011

  • The Barcelona chair was designed by Mies van der Rohe for the German Pavilion at the International Exposition of 1929 in Barcelona, Spain.

    March 29, 2011

  • Arnel is the trademark name of cellulose triacetate made from processing tree fibers, developed in the 1950s. Production was discontinued by the manufacturer in 1986 due to concerns about the toxicity of a chemical used in the manufacturing process.

    March 29, 2011

  • Angostura bitters were developed in Angostura, Venezuela in 1824, by Johann Gottlieb Benjamin Siegert. Angostura bitters is a concentrated flavoring made from roots, berries, herbs and plants in an 80 proof alcohol base. It is often used to flavor alcoholic drinks.

    March 29, 2011

  • An Aldis lamp is a portable lamp used to transmit Morse code. It is named for its British inventor, Arthur C. W. Aldis (1878–1953).

    March 29, 2011

  • Alclad is a trademark of Alcoa for corrosion resistant Aluminium sheet formed from high-purity aluminium surface layers metallurgically bonded to high strength Aluminium Alloy core material.

    March 29, 2011

  • Bracketology is the process of predicting the field of the NCAA Basketball Tournament to fill in tournament brackets for the postseason. ESPN's Joe Lunardi is the inventor of the term "bracketology".

    March 28, 2011

  • The Allen wrench trademark was taken out in 1943 by the Allen Manufacturing Company of Hartford, Connecticut.

    March 26, 2011

  • 1) "Pogo" was apparently an early trademark used for the Pogo stick. George Hansburg created a painted all metal, enclosed-spring pogo stick, which was manufactured in Elmhurst, N.Y., and patented in 1919. Pogoing became a fad in Europe and the U.S. in the early 1920s, and the name "Pogo stick" became genericized.
    2) Walt Kelly ran a wonderful newspaper comic strip "Pogo", starting in 1948 and ran daily through 1975.
    3) In the 1970's, most punk rockers could manage the "Pogo", a dance which involved standing with your feet together and jumping up and down.
    4) "POGO" is a registered trademark of ConAgra Foods Canada Inc. for their hot dog on a stick in batter. Again, the term has become genericized, and corn dogs of this type are referred to as "pogos".

    March 26, 2011

  • 1) "POGO" is a registered trademark of ConAgra Foods Canada Inc. for their hot dog on a stick in batter. The term has become genericized, and corn dogs of this type are referred to as "pogos".
    2) "Pogo" was apparently an early trademark used for the Pogo stick. George Hansburg created a painted all metal, enclosed-spring pogo stick, which was manufactured in Elmhurst, N.Y., and patented in 1919. Pogoing became a fad in Europe and the U.S. in the early 1920s, and the name "Pogo stick" became genericized.
    3) Walt Kelly ran a wonderful newspaper comic strip "Pogo", starting in 1948 and ran daily through 1975.
    4) In the 1970's, most punk rockers could manage the "Pogo", a dance which involved standing with your feet together and jumping up and down.

    March 26, 2011

  • 1) "Pogo" was apparently an early trademark used for the Pogo stick. George Hansburg created a painted all metal, enclosed-spring pogo stick, which was manufactured in Elmhurst, N.Y., and patented in 1919. Pogoing became a fad in Europe and the U.S. in the early 1920s, and the name "Pogo stick" became genericized.
    2) Walt Kelly ran a wonderful newspaper comic strip "Pogo", starting in 1948 and ran daily through 1975.
    3) In the 1970's, most punk rockers could manage the "Pogo", a dance which involved standing with your feet together and jumping up and down.
    4) "POGO" is a registered trademark of ConAgra Foods Canada Inc. for their hot dog on a stick in batter. Again, the term has become genericized, and corn dogs of this type are referred to as "pogos".

    March 26, 2011

  • George Hansburg patented the first pogo stick in 1919.

    March 26, 2011

  • The klaxon horn produced its characteristic sound by striking a spring-steel diaphragm with the teeth of a rotating cogwheel. The diaphragm attaches to a horn that acts as an acoustic transformer and controls the direction of the sound.

    March 26, 2011

  • Airfix is probably most famous for its manufacture of plastic scale model kits of aircraft such as the Spitfire, the Hurricane, and the Harrier "jump-jet". In Britain, the name Airfix is synonymous with the hobby of building models. Modelling kits are often referred to as airfix kits, even when made by another manufacturer.

    March 26, 2011

  • ‘Armco’ originally referred to a type of rust-resisting steel developed for fence wire. The term is now used for many outdoor applications, the best-known of which are barrier and guard rails.

    March 26, 2011

  • On Oct. 5, 1955, a company called Spotless Plastics Corp. registered "baggies" as a trademark. The trademark was later owned by Pactiv Corporation, makers of the "Hefty" trash bag.

    March 26, 2011

  • A chain gun is a type of machine gun that uses a motor-driven loop of chain to power the moving parts of the weapon.

    March 26, 2011

  • Restoring leather is sometimes known as "Connollising", due to the respected reputation of the Connolly Leather company, a British company supplying highly finished leather to car manufacturers. "Connollising" basically involves scrubbing down the leather with a cleaner or soap and a stiff brush or slightly abrasive sponge. This thins and removes most of the original surface color and finish. The leather is then moisturized and recolored, bringing it back as close to original condition as possible.

    March 26, 2011

  • The first cooler sold under the trade mark Esky was manufactured by Malley's Ltd, a Sydney company, in 1952. By 1960, it was claimed that half a million Australian households owned an Esky brand cooler which then featured the design enhancements of a lock-down lid, a drain hole to eliminate melted ice, a bottle opener, and two-tone colour combinations. In 1984, Nylex first manufactured Esky brand coolers in plastic, with some metal components. Since then, construction has continued to shift from the original metal and cork to plastics and CFC-free, foamed-in-place rigid polyurethane.

    March 26, 2011

  • In 1969 Henkel invented the world's first glue stick. Since the first "tubed glue" hit the market, Henkel has sold over 1 billion glue sticks in 121 countries, distributing them worldwide under the Pritt trademark.

    March 25, 2011

  • In the last 50 years, screwcaps have been widely used on wine bottles. The long skirted Stelvin screwcap was developed specifically for the wine bottle from the Stelcap design which was used on wine bottles but not specifically designed for wine bottles. The Stelvin and the Stelcap seals look similar from the outside, but the inner cap lining differs.

    Geoff Linton from Yalumba Wines explains: "It is difficult to separate Stelcaps from Stelvins by externally examining the bottle & closure - they appear the same as the only difference is the wadding - the Stelcap wads, which have a cork layer covered by paper are white in colour while the Stelvin appear silver from a tin layer which is covered by a neutral PVDC which is in contact with the wine."

    March 25, 2011

  • In the last 50 years, screwcaps have been widely used on wine bottles. The Stelvin closure or Stelvin screwcap was developed in the late fifties by the French manufacturer La Bouchage Mecanique. Stelvin is now the registered trademark of Pea-Pechiney.

    The long skirted Stelvin closure was developed specifically for the wine bottle and was developed from the Stelcap design which was used on wine bottles but not specifically designed for wine bottles. The Stelvin and the Stelcap seals look similar from the outside, but the inner cap lining differs.

    Geoff Linton from Yalumba Wines explains: "It is difficult to separate Stelcaps from Stelvins by externally examining the bottle & closure - they appear the same as the only difference is the wadding - the Stelcap wads, which have a cork layer covered by paper are white in colour while the Stelvin appear silver from a tin layer which is covered by a neutral PVDC which is in contact with the wine."

    March 25, 2011

  • "Trademark Law" advises that proper usage is "Scotch brand cellophane tape" to combat "generic tendencies".

    March 25, 2011

  • Continuing to add more terms even as we speak :-)

    March 25, 2011

  • Based out of Glasgow, Scotland, Tannoy is one of the oldest and most respected audio brands in the world. Tannoy developed early public address systems. Its trademark became a generic term in Britain, where the phrase 'Over the Tannoy' is used to describe a PA announcement.

    March 25, 2011

  • Porsche's 911 Targa combined a removable roof with a fixed rollbar/B-pillar, retaining the appeal of an open-air convertible while making some response to increasingly stringent safety regulations of the 1960s.

    March 25, 2011

  • singlet

    February 16, 2011

  • A flame Pokemon. Usually lives in mountains and is very hard to catch.

    December 11, 2010

  • Of course, the logical problem with this is that if it dissolves all bodies, you can't keep it in or near anything -- if it existed, it would by definition dissolve everything around it.

    July 21, 2010

  • I like the snickerdoodle.

    March 30, 2010

  • I think of a pig when I read this.

    March 30, 2010

  • I was thinking of a dog when I put this on the list.

    March 30, 2010

  • I agree with skipvia. but I also think of it as water coming out from a tap.

    March 30, 2010

  • abomasnow is a frost tree pokemon that is known as the ice monster. It can creat blizzards across wide areas in the mountains.

    March 30, 2010

  • eevee is able to take on many different evolutionary forms and can adapt to almost any climate.

    March 26, 2010

  • arceus can transform into any type. The types are: water, fire, ice, ground, grass, flying, normal, dragon, psychic, dark, rock, steel, electric, bug, poison, ghost, and, fighting.

    March 25, 2010

Comments for abigail

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  • Really? You think? (and you're right :-)

    May 4, 2011

  • I'm going to guess the Pokemon list is yours. :-)

    May 4, 2011

  • My daughter sometimes uses this account to make lists too.

    May 4, 2011

  • How would you feel about a stuffed maggot?

    March 29, 2011