Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The harsh sound uttered by a dog.
  • n. A sound, such as a cough, that is similar to a dog's bark.
  • intransitive v. To utter a bark.
  • intransitive v. To make a sound similar to a bark: "The birds bark softly, sounding almost like young pups” ( Charleston SC News and Courier).
  • intransitive v. To speak sharply; snap: "a spot where you can just drop in . . . without anyone's barking at you for failing to plan ahead” ( Andy Birsh).
  • intransitive v. To work as a barker, as at a carnival.
  • transitive v. To utter in a loud, harsh voice: The quarterback barked out the signals.
  • idiom bark up the wrong tree To misdirect one's energies or attention.
  • n. The tough outer covering of the woody stems and roots of trees, shrubs, and other woody plants. It includes all tissues outside the vascular cambium.
  • n. A specific kind of bark used for a special purpose, as in tanning or medicine.
  • transitive v. To remove bark from (a tree or log).
  • transitive v. To rub off the skin of; abrade: barked my shin on the car door.
  • transitive v. To tan or dye (leather or fabric) by steeping in an infusion of bark.
  • transitive v. To treat (a patient) using a medicinal bark infusion.
  • n. A sailing ship with from three to five masts, all of them square-rigged except the after mast, which is fore-and-aft rigged.
  • n. A small vessel that is propelled by oars or sails.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To make a short, loud, explosive noise with the vocal organs (said of animals, especially dogs).
  • v. To make a clamor; to make importunate outcries.
  • v. To speak sharply.
  • n. The short, loud, explosive sound uttered by a dog.
  • n. A similar sound made by some other animals.
  • n. An abrupt loud vocal utterance.
  • n. The exterior covering of the trunk and branches of a tree; the rind.
  • n. Peruvian bark or Jesuit's bark, the bark of the cinchona from which quinine is produced.
  • n. The crust formed on barbecued meat that has had a rub applied to it.
  • v. To strip the bark from; to peel.
  • v. To abrade or rub off any outer covering from.
  • v. To girdle.
  • v. To cover or inclose with bark, or as with bark.
  • n. A small sailing vessel, e.g. a pinnace or a fishing smack; a rowing boat or barge.
  • n. a sailing vessel or boat of any kind.
  • n. A three-masted vessel, having her foremast and mainmast square-rigged, and her mizzenmast schooner-rigged.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. To strip the bark from; to peel.
  • transitive v. To abrade or rub off any outer covering from; as to bark one's heel.
  • transitive v. To girdle. See Girdle, v. t., 3.
  • transitive v. To cover or inclose with bark, or as with bark.
  • intransitive v. To make a short, loud, explosive noise with the vocal organs; -- said of some animals, but especially of dogs.
  • intransitive v. To make a clamor; to make importunate outcries.
  • n. The short, loud, explosive sound uttered by a dog; a similar sound made by some other animals.
  • n. Formerly, any small sailing vessel, as a pinnace, fishing smack, etc.; also, a rowing boat; a barge. Now applied poetically to a sailing vessel or boat of any kind.
  • n. A three-masted vessel, having her foremast and mainmast square-rigged, and her mizzenmast schooner-rigged.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To utter an abrupt explosive cry: said of a dog, and hence of other animals.
  • Figuratively, to clamor; pursue with unreasonable clamor or reproach: usually followed by at.
  • To cough.
  • To utter or give forth with a bark.
  • To break out with: as, to bark out flame.
  • n. The abrupt explosive cry of a dog; hence, a cry resembling that of the dog, uttered by some other animals.
  • n. Generally, the covering of the woody stems, branches, and roots of plants, as distinct and separable from the wood itself.
  • n. Specifically— In pharmacy, Peruvian or Jesuits' bark (see Cinchona).
  • n. In tanning, oak and hemlock barks.
  • To strip off the bark of, or remove a circle of bark from, as a tree; peel; specifically, to scrape off the outer or dead bark of. See barking, 1.
  • Hence To strip or rub off the outer covering of (anything, as the skin): as, to bark one's shins.
  • To cover or inclose with bark: as, to bark a house.
  • To cover, as the bark does a tree; incrust.
  • To apply bark to, as in the process of tanning; tan.
  • To color with an infusion or a decoction of bark: as, to bark sails or cordage.
  • To kill (game) by the concussion of a bullet which strikes the bark of a limb at the spot on which the animal is crouched, or by the flying bark.
  • n. Nautical, a three-masted vessel, fore-and-aft rigged on the mizzenmast, the other two masts being square-rigged.
  • n. A vessel of any kind, especially a sailing vessel of small size.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. speak in an unfriendly tone
  • v. tan (a skin) with bark tannins
  • v. make barking sounds
  • n. tough protective covering of the woody stems and roots of trees and other woody plants
  • n. a noise resembling the bark of a dog
  • n. a sailing ship with 3 (or more) masts
  • v. cover with bark
  • n. the sound made by a dog
  • v. remove the bark of a tree

Etymologies

From Middle English berken, to bark, from Old English beorcan.
Middle English, from Old Norse börkr.
Middle English barke, boat, from Old French barque, from Old Italian barca, from Latin.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English barken, berken, borken, from Old English beorcan ("to bark, bark at"), from the Proto-Germanic *berkanan (“to bark, rumble”), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰereg- (“to make a noise, growl, bark”), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰer- (“to drone, hum, buzz”). Cognate with Icelandic berkja ("to bark, bluster"), Icelandic barki ("throat, windpipe"), Lithuanian dialect burgė́ti, Serbo-Croatian brgljati ("to murmur"). For the noun, compare Old English beorc, bearce ("barking"). (Wiktionary)
From Middle English bark, from Old English barc ("bark"), from Old Norse bǫrkr ("tree bark"), from Proto-Germanic *barkuz, probably related to *birkijōn (“birch”) (compare English birch), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰergo- (compare Latin frāxinus ("ash"), Lithuanian béržas ("birch")), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰereg- (“to gleam; white”) (compare English bright); akin to Danish bark, Icelandic börkr, Low German borke and Albanian berk ("the inner bark of a tree trunk"). (Wiktionary)
From Middle English barke 'boat', from Middle French barque, from Late Latin barca, from Vulgar Latin barica, from Ancient Greek βάρις (báris) 'Egyptian boat', from Coptic bari 'small boat', from Egyptian bēre. (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

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  • an Old English 'dog yelp', Norse 'tree rind' OR a French 'boat'

    February 8, 2013

  • "The tartar deposited by bottled wine or other liquor, encrusting the bottle." --Walter Rye's A Glossary of Words Used in East Anglia, 1895. Published for the English Dialect Society by Henry Frowde.

    May 26, 2011

  • "16. To kill (game) by the concussion of a bullet which strikes the bark of a limb at the spot on which the animal is crouched, or by the flying bark."

    --Century Dictionary

    January 19, 2011

  • I was thinking of a dog when I put this on the list.

    March 30, 2010