Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A simultaneous discharge of firearms.
  • n. The simultaneous release of a rack of bombs from an aircraft.
  • n. The projectiles or bombs thus released.
  • n. Something resembling a release or discharge of bombs or firearms, as:
  • n. A sudden outburst, as of cheers or praise.
  • n. A forceful verbal or written assault.
  • n. A mental provision or reservation.
  • n. Law A saving clause.
  • n. An expedient for protecting one's reputation or for soothing one's conscience.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. An exception; a reservation; an excuse.
  • n. A concentrated fire from pieces of artillery, as in endeavoring to make a break in a fortification; a volley.
  • n. By extension, any volley, as in an argument or debate.
  • n. A salute paid by a simultaneous, or nearly simultaneous, firing of a number of cannon.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. An exception; a reservation; an excuse.
  • n. A concentrated fire from pieces of artillery, as in endeavoring to make a break in a fortification; a volley.
  • n. A salute paid by a simultaneous, or nearly simultaneous, firing of a number of cannon.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. An exception; a reservation; an excuse; a saving fact or clause.
  • n. A general discharge of guns intended as a salute.
  • n. A concentrated fire from a greater or less number of pieces of artillery, for the purpose of breaching, etc., the simultaneous concussion of a number of cannon-balls on masonry, or even earthwork, producing a very destructive effect.
  • n. The combined shouts or cheers of a multitude, generally expressive of honor, esteem, admiration, etc.: as, salvos of applause.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. rapid simultaneous discharge of firearms
  • n. a sudden outburst of cheers
  • n. an outburst resembling the discharge of firearms or the release of bombs

Etymologies

Italian salva, from French salve, from Latin salvē, hail, imperative of salvēre, to be in good health, from salvus, safe; see sol- in Indo-European roots.
Latin salvō (as in Medieval Latin salvō iūre, saving the right), ablative of salvus, safe; see safe.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Latin salvo, ablative of salvus, the past participle of salvāre ("to save, to reserve"), either from salvo jure literally 'the right being reserved', or from salvo errore et omissone 'reserving error and omission'. (Wiktionary)
A 1719 alteration of salva (1591) "simultaneous discharge of guns," from Latin salva ("salute, volley") (compare salve, also from Italian), from Latin salve ("hail"), imperative of salvere: "be in good health!," the usual Roman greeting, regarded as imperative of salvere "to be in good health," (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

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  • There never was a rogue, who had not a salvo to himself for being so.

    Lovelace to Belford, Clarissa by Samuel Richardson

    December 19, 2007

  • Archaic: a bad excuse, evasion, quibble.

    December 19, 2007