nkocharh has looked up 0 words, created 29 lists, listed 818 words, written 63 comments, added 0 tags, and loved 1 word.

Comments by nkocharh

  • Hmm, I'm not sure, seanahan, and a couple minutes' research over at Wikipedia has me no clearer on the subject. It seems it has been called Somaliland for awhile, often with a European proper adjective tacked on the front, depending on who was occupying it at the time.

    Thanks, kce, for your suggestions. I'm amazed I didn't manage to get Constantinople and Byzantium before now, and the other two were entirely new to me.

    January 6, 2007

  • Somehow I didn't get to the flora. Thanks kce!

    January 6, 2007

  • Thanks for the link, that site is fun!

    December 17, 2006

  • There are so many good nautical terms, aren't there? I have a list of my own. I'll probably be stealing some from you, though; your list has already reminded me that I missed ketch.

    December 17, 2006

  • in, ankle. And I am a big fan of "rank" as well. Also, while it doesn't fit on this list exactly, this is the perfect place to mention the word pullet, which conjures all sorts of interesting images in my head.

    December 16, 2006

  • I know it's been suggested, but I can't help re-proposing "shadow" and introducing "cap" (or capital). But then, I do have an entire list on type, so I suppose this is hardly surpirsing. Don't feel pressured to add them if you are only looking for more transitive words. And lastly, would "kids" be too ribald for this list? ;-)

    December 16, 2006

  • Sadly, Wikipedia disagrees on the spelling of the first, but the second one is a fine addition.

    December 16, 2006

  • initiate, supposed

    December 16, 2006

  • SMS, frag, link (as in, "You should see X." "OK, link me.")

    December 16, 2006

  • Most certainly. Thanks!

    December 16, 2006

  • Also: by. Great list!

    December 16, 2006

  • trou?

    December 15, 2006

  • Also, hoity-toity, flip-flop and hurdy-gurdy.

    December 14, 2006

  • I should also mention that "Sic Transit Gloria… Glory Fades" is the name of a Brand New song about a boy whose first time (which happens to be with an experienced wench) doesn't go to plan. Pretty clearly a reference to Rushmore, IMHO.

    December 13, 2006

  • "PIN number" and "ATM machine" are my bêtes noires.

    December 13, 2006

  • See: Iraq

    December 13, 2006

  • I fear I may have led you astray! Unbeknownst to me, controvertible is apparently a perfectly serviceable word. In fact, I've decided to go whole hog and change it to vertible on my list. Cuz that's how I roll.

    December 13, 2006

  • True, removing one prefix would leave you with "defatigable." But I found it more whimsical to go all the way and take 'em both. And this list is nothing if not chock-a-block with whimsy.

    December 13, 2006

  • Thank you, angharad, that link was beautiful.

    December 13, 2006

  • Look at that, this list has already been assembled.

    December 13, 2006

  • topsy-turvy? teepee?

    A couple corrections, if I may: "willy-nilly," "fuddy-duddy," and "hoi polloi."
    Oh, and you beat me to this outstanding list. :-)

    December 13, 2006

  • Yet another stupendous list, Asativum! I was all set to do this one, but you beat me to it.

    I suggest people head on over to Wikipedia to match the collections up with their animals. And from that list, might I also suggest: bloat, skulk, flange, troop, sedge and tower.

    And lastly, my friend has coined his own collective noun: a swagger of pirates. I suggest everyone put this to use in all future piratical descriptions.

    December 13, 2006

  • Oh, this list is just beautiful! Give me an archaic English word over a Japanese one any day of the week.

    December 13, 2006

  • That's right in line with "fatigable" and "peccable," so I'm all for it. And I'm glad I could help with your list. :-)

    Thanks for helping me have fun here, everyone! My favorite part about this list is reading a "word" (most here aren't, obviously) and having to think a second before recognizing the commonly used modified form. Probaly why I loved "ert" so much, and because it sounds like yurt.

    Oh, I really am a wordie, aren't I? :-D

    December 13, 2006

  • What a fantastic word! Here's a single-click link to the definition.

    December 13, 2006

  • A very good start! I stole a couple. :-)

    December 13, 2006

  • An excellent set from an original wordie! I would like to note that a recent and (relatively) high-profile reference of Jabberwocky was the song "Vogt Dig Vor Kloppervok" by The Books.

    December 13, 2006

  • So, my OAED says that ignominy and apopleptic aren't strictly compound words, at least not at the natural divisions one would expect. (It would seem to need to be "gnominy," the word having come from "gnomen.") Infer, however, is a straightforward prefix, and an excellent addition. :-) Thanks!

    December 13, 2006

  • ROFL! (I'm in a meeting right now, or I really would be.)

    December 13, 2006

  • You'll be wanting the UD definition of this one….

    December 13, 2006

  • My friend has a black BMW M3 which has BONZER as its license plate. I laugh every time I see it, mostly for the word's propinquity to boner.

    December 13, 2006

  • Ack! Spam!! :-(

    December 13, 2006

  • Excellent! I particularly like "primer" and "august", though I think "slough" will have to be my favorite. Favorited. :-)

    December 13, 2006

  • Thank you all! I think "ert" is my favorite so far. :-D

    Also, about peach(ment): I feel that will go nicely with (cu)cumber.

    December 13, 2006

  • Wasn't it "run" which had the greatest number of definitions?

    December 13, 2006

  • Wikipedia has a terribly interesting article on this word.

    December 13, 2006

  • You're amazing, oroboros! Thanks!

    December 13, 2006

  • Everything to do with clothes, and the making thereof.

    December 13, 2006

  • Suggestions welcome!

    December 13, 2006

  • Oooh, gadabout! I knew the word, but had forgotten the definition. Thanks!

    December 13, 2006

  • Just so.

    December 12, 2006

  • You know when you watch The Colbert Report and all those words scroll by in the intro? These are they.

    December 12, 2006

  • God, this list makes my skin crawl.

    December 12, 2006

  • Zoltan! What does this mean in English? The only place I have heard this is in the movie Dude, Where's My Car? where it was the name of an alien.

    December 12, 2006

  • Also: pædophile, centre, cheque, draught, programme, tyre, manœuvre

    December 12, 2006

  • Max Fischer: What was your major?
    Rosemary Cross: I didn't have a major, but my thesis was on Latin American economic policy.
    MF: Oh, that's interesting. Did you hear they're not going to teach Latin here anymore?
    RC: This was more like Central America.
    MF: Oh, Central America and whatnot. Hmm. But moving on: They're gonna cancel Latin. They've got to make room for Japanese.
    RC: That's a shame because all the romance languages are based on Latin.
    MF: Yeah, they are, aren't they?
    RC: Nihilo sanctum estne?
    MF: What's that? Oh, it's Latin, isn't it? What does that mean?
    RC: Is nothing sacred?
    MF: Sic transit gloria. Glory fades. I'm Max Fischer.
    RC: Hi.
    MF: Hi.

    December 12, 2006

  • Aah, I had forgotten about venison. Thanks! Yes, the food dichotomy was one of the things that stuck out for me when I listened to the BBC adaptation of Bryson's Mother Tongue. The reason for the difference between food au naturel and at table made perfect sense once explained, but was still a revelation.

    December 12, 2006

  • Excellent, thanks!

    December 12, 2006

  • This word has the dubious distinction of being used in Scientology matériel like so:

    "Here is an example: 'It was found that when the crepuscule arrived the children were quieter and when it was not present, they were much livelier.' What happens is you think you do not understand the whole idea, but the inability to understand comes entirely from the one word you could not define, crepuscule, which means twilight or darkness."

    There you have it, from L. Ron Hubbard himself.

    December 12, 2006

  • Words which are also used as names. Suggestions welcome.

    December 12, 2006

  • Why they changed it, I can't say

    December 12, 2006

  • Wow, I didn't know slatch. Interestingly enough, my copy of Smyth's The Sailor's Word-Book doesn't even list the word. But it's an excellent one, and I've added it to both the lists you suggested. Thanks!

    December 12, 2006

  • I realize that more than half our language is imported, but these are some words that either are particularly obvious examples of that, or are surprising, or I just think are fun to say.

    December 12, 2006

  • We call these places by different names, now.

    December 12, 2006

  • "It is said that the effect of eating too much lettuce is 'soporific.'

    "I have never felt sleepy after eating lettuces; but then I am not a rabbit.

    "They certainly had a very soporific effect upon the Flopsy Bunnies!"
    -Beatrix Potter, The Tale of the Flopsy Bunnies.

    December 12, 2006

  • "In my judgment, this new paradigm renders obsolete Geneva's strict limitations on questioning of enemy prisoners and renders quaint some of its provisions." -Alberto Gonzales, 2002

    December 12, 2006

  • "Ideas are great arrows, but there has to be a bow. And politics is the bow of idealism." -Bill Moyers

    December 12, 2006

  • It appears I am not the only one in love with The Decemberists.

    December 12, 2006

  • Wi' my best girlie by my side, we'd sing… sing… sing!

    December 12, 2006

  • I would like to propose the addition of asterisk, which I often hear pronounced "asterik".

    December 12, 2006

  • By "Sauselito" do you in fact mean "Sausalito," the town in California? And I should mention that I'm fully on board with the punctuational appointments.

    December 12, 2006

  • Is this word misspelled, or just supremely rare? None of the references above seem to have heard of it.

    December 12, 2006

  • This word has a splendid derivation.

    December 11, 2006

  • Thank you, Edward Gorey.

    December 11, 2006

Comments for nkocharh

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  • Good lists thx!

    December 23, 2008

  • I love your lists, and also what you said "about nkocharh" That certainly sums it up for me, too.

    June 17, 2007

  • Wow, I didn't know slatch. Interestingly enough, my copy of Smyth's The Sailor's Word-Book doesn't even list the word. But it's an excellent one, and I've added it to both the lists you suggested. Thanks!

    December 12, 2006

  • i'm suprised you don't have slatch listed. i'm not sure if it'd go under The Mariner's Record or I do not think it means what you think it means, but its a wonderful little word.

    December 12, 2006

  • thanks for aye-aye,'tho i thot i'd entered that one along with ack-ackyesterday. go figure...

    December 12, 2006