slumry has looked up 804 words, created 82 lists, listed 6656 words, written 1327 comments, added 0 tags, and loved 7 words.

Comments by slumry

  • See my foot.

    May 21, 2015

  • See also Getting to Know Jack and jack-of-all-trades

    May 21, 2015

  • Appalachian folk tales, an oral tradition.

    May 20, 2015

  • This is a fun one, fbharjo! What about Jack Sprat, Jack tales, jack tar and the beloved Jack in the Beanstalk

    May 20, 2015

  • Don't know where this old one belongs: "Gotta getta gocart if you're gonna getta girl."

    May 19, 2015

  • In some societies, a taboo against using the name of someone who recently died.

    May 19, 2015

  • Carolyn says, "Lloyd says he is a rough diamond, but I say he is just rough."

    May 19, 2015

  • graverobbers,body snatchers

    May 19, 2015

  • the halt, the lame, and the blind

    May 19, 2015

  • see one, do one, teach one

    May 19, 2015

  • For example, when you have to clean up quickly before unexpected company, you may give the house a lick and a promise.

    May 19, 2015

  • Thanks,ruzuzu. I had fun recalling all of those delicate wild lilies,

    May 18, 2015

  • Bicyclists with helmets, according to some wags.

    May 16, 2015

  • A new term to me. Apparently it is a row of bicycles for sharing. Seattle has such a program

    May 16, 2015

  • So a filibusterer is akin to a freebooter (pirate). It makes sense, actually.

    May 15, 2015

  • You have come to the right place, msmith. Do you fancy any particular sort of words?

    May 15, 2015

  • See etymologist

    May 15, 2015

  • a portmanteau word

    May 14, 2015

  • The Chinook dictionary that I rely on most is:
    Chinook: A History and Dictionary by Edward Harper Thomas, first published in 1935. The author defines skookum as follows:

    "Strong, powerful, potent. Originally a ghost, evil spirit, or demon.

    This is one of the best known, most widely used and significant words in the Jargon. Its adoption by people of the Northwest has made it a regional English word...In fact, it is so common on the Pacific Coast as to have almost lost its Indian significance."

    May 14, 2015

  • If you are from the northwestern US, or from British Columbia, you might say skookum.

    May 14, 2015

  • Those eccentric girls have some very peculiar names.

    May 13, 2015

  • A fine Mothers' day word!

    May 10, 2015

  • syncope

    May 10, 2015

  • typo for neurotypical?

    May 9, 2015

  • In contradistinction to transformational grammar

    May 9, 2015

  • eggcorn.  See for all intents and purposes

    May 9, 2015

  • That book has got to go...but wait, I might read it some day.

    May 9, 2015

  • A noun? If so, I guess it would be a thrashing of buttocks.

    May 9, 2015

  • Also "undergraduate degree."  If an undergraduate is a student who has not yet earned a degree, what is an undergraduate degree?

    May 9, 2015

  • my mother's term for flatulence, God rest her barely post-Victorian soul.

    May 8, 2015

  • I agree, TankHughes--that unutterable phrase is truly an amomination.

    May 8, 2015

  • Oh no, not sticker! My precocious niece, when she was very small, naïve to country living, and a brand new talker corrected me when I told her she would get stickers in her feet if she went outside barefoot. She said, "Do you mean thorns?"

    May 8, 2015

  • not to be confused with a compound word.

    May 8, 2015

  • I nominate commentate.

    May 8, 2015

  • As you live alone in the bee-loud glade, you may while away your hours deflecting the dread honeyguide

    May 8, 2015

  • What about the honeyguide? That bird sounds to me like a procurer.

    May 8, 2015

  • An instance of nerdview, I think.

    May 7, 2015

  • A coinage of the linguists at languagelog The state of mind of people who use jargon of their trade, oblivious to the fact that the people to whom they speak do not share that jargon. It seems to be a failure of Theory of Mind.

    May 7, 2015

  • That is wonderful, qms!

    May 7, 2015

  • going to and fro.

    May 7, 2015

  • Oh, what has become of the subjunctive?

    May 7, 2015

  • See antimacassar

    May 6, 2015

  • It is so odd that all of the examples shown refer to the word as misconstrued. Does this misconstruction constitute an eggcorn?

    May 6, 2015

  • Hm...after a full 5 minutes thought, I am of the opinion that a Camaydian, if there is such a person, would be a Caymanian expat living in Canada. It is a matter of emphasis. Caymadian emphasizes the Cayman element; Camaydian would highlight Canada.

    May 6, 2015

  • Should be capitalized. Habakkuk is a book in the compilation variously called the Old Testament or the Hebrew Bible, if you are speaking from a Christian POV, or simply the Bible if you are Jewish. Habakkuk was one of the twelve minor prophets.

    May 6, 2015

  • To out potlatch someone is to create an imbalance in a relationship by giving gifts that are more extravagant or more numerous than the gifts you receive.

    May 6, 2015

  • Ha! Usually no gift giving is involved.

    May 6, 2015

  • A communal meal where everyone contributes a dish. See also potluck and carry-in.

    May 6, 2015

  • Communal meals that are usually called potlucks in this region are, I am told, called carry-ins in Indiana.

    May 6, 2015

  • A Canadian expat living in the Cayman Islands. Seen on a T shirt.

    May 6, 2015

  • Several of these are not BC specific. "Skookum," for example, was in locally common parlance where I grew up in the Chehalis river valley. It comes from the Chehalis people. There is a Skookumchuck River that flows the Chehalis.

    May 6, 2015

  • Right. It seems to have come into English as "mowich." Google that and you will find several west coast place names--notably Mowich Lake in Mt. Rainier national park.

    May 6, 2015

  • Well...a coatee is a certain style of jacket; a frog is an ornamental sort of fastener for the front of a coat...

    May 6, 2015

  • Thanks, Wordnik, for providing examples if no definition. Mowich is from the Chinook Jargon and means deer, or venison.

    May 6, 2015

  • megayachts owned by the superrich?

    May 5, 2015

  • Or silly feet--ped=feet+ridiculous

    August 13, 2007

  • I have always heard both pronounced the same way, with a short i, rhyming with chivvy.

    August 12, 2007

  • Apparently you can still buy carbon paper; if I rummaged enough, I probably would find some at home.

    August 12, 2007

  • I am also a long time fan of Lakoff.

    August 12, 2007

  • You sound as if you have more intimate knowledge of this than you would like.

    August 12, 2007

  • Welcome, Infostyx! I also became an instant addict--I am enjoying your list. Oroboros is right--that delete function seems to be broken.

    August 12, 2007

  • Teach your grandmother to suck eggs.

    August 12, 2007

  • What? Never made a carbon copy? What?

    August 12, 2007

  • Looks like you have been reading George Lakoff, O.

    August 11, 2007

  • In contrast to eulogistic.

    August 11, 2007

  • I think I first read about phylacteries in Chaim Potok's novels. So many books, so little time!

    August 10, 2007

  • He said he did not need to eat blueberries because he wears his seatbelt. That is what he said. *groan here*

    August 10, 2007

  • Oh, Reesetee, you mean I really do have voices in my head, too? In that case, I also wonder why I can't get them all to agree with each other.

    I think I will opt to simply enjoy the illusion.

    August 10, 2007

  • It was a memorable conversation, U.

    And R--I feel sure you will fill your suitcase with plenty of Canadianisms!

    August 9, 2007

  • *Green with envy*

    August 9, 2007

  • It happens. Old abandoned cameras, that sort of thing. :)

    August 9, 2007

  • I like it!

    August 9, 2007

  • I like this word! When very old Kodak film is developed, the pictures are all purplish--a phenomenon I saw demonstrated this week. Our 20 year old selves all all empurpled.

    August 9, 2007

  • I agree, with you, U (amazing, I know). These idiosyncratic lists are fun. I also like to frustrate myself by looking at the inscrutable lists where it is hard to see what the lister was getting at.

    August 9, 2007

  • Okay, I am getting separation anxiety now. I will miss you two voices in my head next week. (Dear S calls all of you my imaginary friends). U, give your regards to Granny Smith. R, do you to care to give us any hint of your vacation plans?

    August 9, 2007

  • Any particular writing's of Wilber's that you can cite on that subject?

    August 9, 2007

  • Are you sure? It may be very lonely!

    August 9, 2007

  • Well, he should care--if you are a part of him, he would be diminished by your absence. Says Judge Slumry. So there.

    August 9, 2007

  • And just wait until I start in on the word fancy!

    August 9, 2007

  • Oooh, I hadn't thought of that!

    August 9, 2007

  • Invective and spleen and treason too? Wow! Am I a Wordie heretic? Will I be burned on a pyre?

    I will join with my conbrethren and found the Savesave sect.

    August 9, 2007

  • This is a great list, and enlightening. I am going to add umpty-umpth to my words, because I particulary like it as an ordinal.

    I like infinity minus one a lot too, U. It reminds me of the old joke about the natural history museum docent. Asked how old a particular fossil was, he said "Two million and twenty one years." As explanation for such a precise number, he explained that when he started working there 21 years ago, it was two million years old.

    August 9, 2007

  • It always amuses me--it was a favorite of my mother's, usually used semi-humorously.

    August 9, 2007

  • That is interesting. As I recall, one of Freud's translators more or less coined this word as a translation of a German word that means someting like "to occupy" If a person cathects something, he or she invests emotional energy in it and makes it his own. Bruno Bettelheim wrote a book about what he regarded as the mis-translation of Freud's writing.

    August 9, 2007

  • Stuff and nonsense! Eyewash! Save is a perfectly fine preposition, having evolved in parallel with the other sense of save. It does mean except.

    As for having cofusingly contranymic meanings, that is just balderdash. It may be a near-contranym, but in practice it would take a real dunderhead to fail to understand the two meanings.

    August 9, 2007

  • Rosa rugosa has wringkly leaves

    August 8, 2007

  • Used as an expression of disbelief; poppycock

    August 8, 2007

  • "We sailed for America, and there made certain preparations. This took but little time. Two members of my family elected to go with me. Also a carbuncle. The dictionary says a carbuncle is a kind of jewel. Humor is out of place in a dictionary."

    Mark Twain, Following the Equator, Chapter 1, page 1

    August 8, 2007

  • Thank you for this Poetrie, Reesettee!

    August 7, 2007

  • As a noun, celestial refers to a heavenly being, a god or angel.

    August 7, 2007

  • the doctrine of transmigration of souls into another body

    August 7, 2007

  • That's what the sign on the peaches at the grocery store said.

    August 6, 2007

  • deranged

    August 6, 2007

  • Bad mitten! Bad mitten! Go to your room, mitten!

    August 4, 2007

  • There are some words I just can't pass up; this is one.

    August 4, 2007

  • This word makes me blush--then I remember: food--it is food they are talking about.

    August 4, 2007

  • Aw gee. . .I am glad you did that. I love Edward Lear. I was trying to recall if it was the honey or the money that was wrapped up in the five pound note. It sounds like it was both!

    August 3, 2007

  • Oh, I must add mercurochrome to my evocative smells list! And speaking of stains, this made me think of gentian violet.

    August 3, 2007

  • a bit of a stretch, maybe, but what about under a bushel?

    August 3, 2007

  • Thanks--that was fun to do--and I had to do it, because you had planted an earworm! :)

    August 3, 2007

  • sieve? And I just learned that a pink is a small sailing vessel

    August 3, 2007

  • Poetrie: The Jumblies
    Inspired by Reesetee's Out to Sea list

    August 3, 2007

  • I second that--nice list; I like the Lyle Lovett quote. In fact, I think I will stop listening to this disturbing news about the nation's infrastructure and listen to some Lyle Lovett.

    August 2, 2007

  • Why, to make mercurial ointment, of course: "In the old formula for making mercurial ointment, the quicksilver is merely directed to be rubbed with the axunge and suet until it be killed, which is nearly impossible. . ."
    from The Edinborugh Medical and Surgical Journal, 1805

    August 2, 2007

  • full of whims; whimsical

    August 2, 2007

  • a Japanese textile art

    August 2, 2007

  • Japanese braid making

    August 2, 2007

  • Probably an echoic for hitting

    August 2, 2007

  • a cup or glass filled to the brim

    August 2, 2007

  • surpassingly

    August 2, 2007

  • Formed by apocope from pudding. Used to refer to dessert in general. "What's for pud?

    August 1, 2007

  • The extinct animal was a mastodon, not a mastadon.

    August 1, 2007

  • Sounds like if you tried to walk on it, it would be a slip 'n slide!

    August 1, 2007

  • a club moss

    August 1, 2007

  • reverberation

    August 1, 2007

  • a preposition that means in regard to or concerning

    August 1, 2007

  • Cedar shakes look similar to cedar shingles; however, the shakes are split rather than sawn.

    August 1, 2007

  • Alas, I have offended. I am undone!

    August 1, 2007

  • a sluggard

    August 1, 2007

  • a factotum

    August 1, 2007

  • Wordie, scrambled

    August 1, 2007

  • Or we could go the other directions and call ourselves Wordors.

    August 1, 2007

  • Yup, less-than-skillful painting at that.

    August 1, 2007

  • After the eponymous President Hoover--a collection of shacks and huts at the edge of the city where unemployed people lived in the 1930s

    August 1, 2007

  • Just a step removed--summed up flippantly by "I don't know and I don't care."

    August 1, 2007

  • verb: to clean with a vacuum cleaner

    August 1, 2007

  • Ah yes, glad to remember this one.

    August 1, 2007

  • A Canadian expat who lives in the Cayman Islands. (in jest, of course) Seen on a T shirt worn by an American who would like to pass for Caymadian.

    August 1, 2007

  • It is real--from OED--funny, huh?

    August 1, 2007

  • OED says: "One who sells; a seller; sometimes in restricted sense, a street-seller."

    I have seen it used only in the restricted sense, such as the "food venders" at fairs.

    August 1, 2007

  • OED says: "late Anglo-French; earlier vendour from the French vendeur. One who disposes of a thing by sale; a seller." Cf. vender

    August 1, 2007

  • the act of vending; sale

    August 1, 2007

  • a diminutive dwarf

    August 1, 2007

  • accompaniments or ingredients for food

    August 1, 2007

  • intransitive verb: to be dark and threatening; also lour. noun: an angry or threatening look

    August 1, 2007

  • Hyoscyamus niger

    August 1, 2007

  • Atropa belladonna

    August 1, 2007

  • It is what allows a dandelion or thistle seed to sail through the air.

    August 1, 2007

  • Results of a medical test where, "a penlight shone in the mouth reveals a brain so small that the whole head lights up." Doctor humor, or so I hear. ;-) Some days I feel pumpkin positive.

    August 1, 2007

  • bullfighter; also toreadors, a style of pants worn by women in the 1950s

    August 1, 2007

  • life as seen through rose-tinted glasses

    August 1, 2007

  • hurdy gurdy

    August 1, 2007

  • dried leaves of jimson weed

    August 1, 2007

  • a name for jimson weed and other plants

    August 1, 2007

  • datura stramonium

    August 1, 2007

  • also daturine

    August 1, 2007

  • a poisonous alkaloid, also called atropine

    August 1, 2007

  • a genus of small trees in the rose family

    August 1, 2007

  • several species of crataegus are called hawthorn

    August 1, 2007

  • datura stramonium; also the fruit of the hawthorn

    August 1, 2007

  • datura, jimson weed, stinkweed or thorn apple; a poisonous tropical plant

    August 1, 2007

  • atropa belladonna, most commonly known as belladonna or deadly nightshade

    August 1, 2007

  • a small fishing boat; also walleye

    August 1, 2007

  • walleye

    August 1, 2007

  • walleyed pike, dory

    August 1, 2007

  • custard

    August 1, 2007

  • custard

    August 1, 2007

  • Mmm...custard. Dang, I should make some custard.

    August 1, 2007

  • a donothing; a slacker

    July 31, 2007

  • Thanks--you are right, these words represent wonderful memories.

    July 30, 2007

  • Maybe I could gut most of the rooms in my house and install bookshelves and reading nooks--oh wait, my SO would have an opinion, too. Rats!

    July 30, 2007

  • You are so right, R. I am trying to figure out where to put all my books as it is--but dictionaries, and especially OED, are sacred, aren't they? :)

    July 30, 2007

  • Jen and Reesettee, thank you--you are right. Marji was a good friend whopassed away last March from melanoma. I was felt moved to list some Marji words last week; the word compote triggered the list! Funny, the power of words. :)

    July 30, 2007

  • I agree, gerwitz--it is so much easier to use the on-line sources. My OED is the two volume set with magnifying glass; it is a major productionfor me to use it. I would love to be able to use the on-line OED but there is no way I could justify the expense for my current purposes.

    July 30, 2007

  • Actually, whyever is in the OED. And whyever shouldn't it be?

    July 30, 2007

  • Scottish--slowly enlivening after waking. A word I need!

    July 30, 2007

  • obsolete--having many paths

    July 30, 2007

  • Funny, I had the opposite reaction: "Aha, makes sense to me."

    July 29, 2007

  • also shivaree, which is phonetic

    July 29, 2007

  • Beware the etymological fallacy.

    July 28, 2007

  • This was a very disturbing bit of information in today's news, wasn't it?

    July 27, 2007

  • Sigh. Yes, an unavoidable bit of reality, isn't it:)

    July 27, 2007

  • I would imagine that we will need to figure out a time that is good for all of us, since we all have commitments and are in different time zones.

    July 27, 2007

  • Then they would need to take a second look, wouldn't they? I remember a perhaps-apocryphal story aout a crusade against the word niggardly. There is enough genuinely racist speech to object to; we don't need to imagine it where it does not exist.

    July 27, 2007

  • As the newcomer, I defer to the rest of you.

    July 27, 2007

  • Hey, U--good to see you.

    July 27, 2007

  • unselfish love or mouth wide open

    July 26, 2007

  • walking

    July 26, 2007

  • I can empathize!

    July 26, 2007

  • To select the best portion; cherry pick

    July 26, 2007

  • an informal conversation, especially for the purpose of problem solving; short for confabulation. Let's have a confab!

    July 26, 2007

  • Me too!

    July 26, 2007

  • carbohydrates

    July 26, 2007

  • snicker

    July 26, 2007

  • National Public Radio, of course

    July 26, 2007

  • Ah yes, that phenomenon, she blushed, recalling the upwelling of giggles at her own wedding, which was fortunately a tiny wedding.

    July 26, 2007

  • Thanks, R.

    July 26, 2007

  • I wondered about what pigs had to to with it too! Of course that was what attracted me to the word. The truth turned out to be interesting also.

    July 26, 2007

  • household management Greek root of economics

    July 26, 2007

  • I have decided maybe I like tonocation; now what is the liguistics term for dropping a middle syllable, in this case lo?

    July 26, 2007

  • I know a Swedish woman who pronounces it that way. It is actually charming. :)

    July 26, 2007

  • As in salmon's imperative

    July 26, 2007

  • Thanks, palooka, this is a word well worth pilfering.

    Now, I wonder what word this could spawn to describe the process of looking for a cell phone by dialing its number.

    July 26, 2007

  • I like the word too. I think I will tuck it away in a drawer--it might make a good Christmas present. I hope I don't forget where I put it!

    July 26, 2007

  • Yes, my mother always warned me to avoid sacrilege. Chastened.

    July 26, 2007

  • I wonder if the job requires stagged pants.

    July 26, 2007

  • A funny image, R. . .I wonder what the priest's motivation in swinging censors would be. . .would such swinging punish the censor or the congregants? "Church was grim today. I was censor-whipped."

    July 26, 2007

  • Indeed. But don't tell him I told you so! :)

    July 26, 2007

  • I've seen many references to individual words and reflected on how common the phenomenon is. I will have to dig to find the lists. However, as always, reality intrudes. ;-)

    July 26, 2007

Comments for slumry

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • We miss you!!! :( jennarenn

    July 22, 2008

  • Hey, aren't you also on the UU readers on Librarything? A UU are U?

    June 15, 2007