Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Botany An indehiscent fruit derived from a single ovary and having the whole wall fleshy, such as the grape or tomato.
  • n. A small, juicy, fleshy fruit, such as a blackberry or raspberry, regardless of its botanical structure.
  • n. Any of various seeds or kernels, as of dried wheat.
  • n. The small, dark egg of certain crustaceans or fishes.
  • intransitive v. To hunt for or gather berries: went berrying in July.
  • intransitive v. To bear or produce berries.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A small fruit, of any one of many varieties.
  • n. A soft fruit which develops from a single ovary and contains seeds not encased in pits.
  • v. To pick berries.
  • n. A mound; a barrow.
  • n. A burrow, especially a rabbit's burrow.
  • n. An excavation; a military mine.
  • v. To beat; give a beating to; thrash.
  • v. To thresh (grain).

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Any small fleshy fruit, as the strawberry, mulberry, huckleberry, etc.
  • n. A small fruit that is pulpy or succulent throughout, having seeds loosely imbedded in the pulp, as the currant, grape, blueberry.
  • n. The coffee bean.
  • n. One of the ova or eggs of a fish.
  • intransitive v. To bear or produce berries.
  • n. A mound; a hillock.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In botany: In ordinary use, any small pulpy fruit, as the huckleberry, strawberry, blackberry, mulberry, cheekerberry, etc., of which only the first is a berry in the technical sense.
  • n. Technically, a simple fruit in which the entire pericarp is fleshy, excepting the outer skin or epicarp, as the banana, tomato, grape, currant, etc.
  • n. The dry kernel of certain kinds of grain, etc., as the berry of wheat and barley, or the coffee-berry. See cut under wheat.
  • n. Something resembling a berry, as one of the ova or eggs of lobsters, crabs, or other crustaceans, or the drupe of Rhamnus infectorius, used in dyeing.
  • To bear or produce berries.
  • To gather berries: as, to go berrying.
  • n. A mound; a barrow.
  • n. A burrow, especially a rabbit's burrow.
  • n. An excavation; a military mine.
  • To beat; give a beating to.
  • To thresh (grain, etc.).
  • n. A gust of wind.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. pick or gather berries
  • n. any of numerous small and pulpy edible fruits; used as desserts or in making jams and jellies and preserves
  • n. United States rock singer (born in 1931)
  • n. a small fruit having any of various structures, e.g., simple (grape or blueberry) or aggregate (blackberry or raspberry)

Etymologies

Middle English berye, from Old English berie; see bhā-1 in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English berye, from Old English beriġe, from Proto-Germanic *bazjan (compare German Beere, Danish bær), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰes- ‘to blow, chew, rub’ (compare Tocharian B pās- ‘to whisper’, Albanian fshij ‘to sweep, wipe’, Ancient Greek psāein ‘to rub’, Sanskrit बभस्ति (bábhasti) ‘he chews, devours')[2]. For the semantic development, compare Old Church Slavonic gruša ‘pear’, from grušiti ‘to break, destroy’; Latin pirum ‘pear’, from *peis- ‘to stick, pound’.[3] (Wiktionary)
From Middle English berȝe, berghe, from Old English beorġe, dative form of beorg ("mountain, hill, mound, barrow"), from Proto-Germanic *bergaz, *mountain, hill. More at barrow. (Wiktionary)
From Middle English bery ("a burrow"). More at burrow. (Wiktionary)
From Middle English beryen, berien, from Old English *berian (found only in past participle ġebered ("crushed, kneaded, harassed, oppressed, vexed")), from Proto-Germanic *barjanan (“to beat, hit”), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰer- (“to rip, cut, split, grate”). Cognate with Scots berry, barry ("to thresh, thrash"), German beren ("to beat, knead"), Icelandic berja ("to beat"), Latin feriō ("strike, hit", v). (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

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  • like blackberry, yum

    February 25, 2009