Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Any of various fleshy fungi of the class Basidiomycota, characteristically having an umbrella-shaped cap borne on a stalk, especially any of the edible kinds, as those of the genus Agaricus.
  • n. Something shaped like one of these fungi.
  • intransitive v. To multiply, grow, or expand rapidly: The population mushroomed in the postwar decades.
  • intransitive v. To swell or spread out into a shape similar to a mushroom.
  • adj. Relating to, consisting of, or containing mushrooms: mushroom sauce.
  • adj. Resembling mushrooms in rapidity of growth or evanescence: mushroom towns.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Any of the fleshy fruiting bodies of fungi typically produced above ground on soil or on their food sources (such as decaying wood).
  • n. A fungus producing such fruiting bodies.
  • n. champignon or Agaricus bisporus, the mushroom species most commonly used in cooking.
  • n. One of the mushroom-shaped pegs in bar billiards.
  • adj. Containing or being made of mushrooms.
  • adj. Resembling a mushroom by shape or appearance.
  • v. To grow quickly to a large size.
  • v. To gather mushrooms.
  • v. (Of a bullet) To form the shape of a mushroom when a bullet impacts a soft target.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n.
  • n. An edible fungus (Agaricus campestris), having a white stalk which bears a convex or oven flattish expanded portion called the pileus. This is whitish and silky or somewhat scaly above, and bears on the under side radiating gills which are at first flesh-colored, but gradually become brown. The plant grows in rich pastures and is proverbial for rapidity of growth and shortness of duration. It has a pleasant smell, and is largely used as food. It is also cultivated from spawn.
  • n. Any large fungus developing a visible fruiting body with a stem and cap, usu. of the basidiomycetes
  • n. One who rises suddenly from a low condition in life; an upstart.
  • adj. Of or pertaining to mushrooms.
  • adj. Resembling mushrooms in rapidity of growth and shortness of duration; short-lived; ephemerial.
  • intransitive v. to grow or expand rapidly.
  • intransitive v. to grow so much and so rapidly as to change qualitatively; used with into.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A cryptogamic plant of the class Fungi: applied in a general sense to almost any of the larger, conspicuous fungi, such as toadstools, puffballs, Hydnei, etc., but more particularly to the agaricoid fungi and especially to the edible forms.
  • n.
  • n. An upstart; one who rises rapidly from a low condition in life.
  • n. A small mushroom-shaped protuberance that sometimes forms on the end of the negative carbon in arc-lamps.
  • Of or pertaining to mushrooms; made of mushrooms: as, mushroom sauce.
  • Resembling mushrooms in rapidity of growth and in unsubstantiality; ephemeral; upstart: as, mushroom aristocracy.
  • To elevate suddenly in position or rank.
  • Having the form or shape of a mushroom or toadstool; formed like the segment of a sphere; said of valves, anchors, etc.
  • To spread out at the top in a form resembling that of a mushroom; curve over at the top; curve down from the top like a mushroom.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a large cloud of rubble and dust shaped like a mushroom and rising into the sky after an explosion (especially of a nuclear bomb)
  • n. fleshy body of any of numerous edible fungi
  • n. any of various fleshy fungi of the subdivision Basidiomycota consisting of a cap at the end of a stem arising from an underground mycelium
  • v. pick or gather mushrooms
  • n. mushrooms and related fleshy fungi (including toadstools, puffballs, morels, coral fungi, etc.)
  • n. common name for an edible agaric (contrasting with the inedible toadstool)
  • v. grow and spread fast

Etymologies

Alteration (influenced by room) of Middle English musheron, from Anglo-Norman moscheron, musherum, from Old French mousseron, from Medieval Latin musariō, musariōn-.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English musheron, musseron, from Anglo-Norman, from Old French mousseron, from Medieval Latin mussiriōnem, musariōnem, accusative of mussiriō, musariō ("mushroom"), of Germanic origin: French mousse ("moss") (—first applied to a type of fungus which grows in moss), from Low Frankish *mosa ("moss") or Old Dutch mosa "moss", akin to Old High German mos ("moss, bog"), Old High German mios ("moss, mire"), Old English mēos ("moss"), Old English mōs ("bog, marsh"), Old Norse mosi ("moss"), Old Norse myrr ("bog, mire"), from Proto-Germanic *musan, *musô, *miuziz (“mosses, bog”), from Proto-Indo-European *meus- (“mosses, mold, mildew”). Replaced native swamm ("mushroom") from Old English. More at mire (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Each tin mushroom is numbered and represents one mushroom left in reality.

    Fly Shelf with a Projection Screen Integrated

  • Some apply the term mushroom to a single species, the one in cultivation, and which grows also in fields (_Agaricus campestris_), and call all others toadstools.

    Studies of American Fungi. Mushrooms, Edible, Poisonous, etc.

  • It is becoming customary with some students to apply the term mushroom to the entire group of higher fungi to which the mushroom belongs (_Basidiomycetes_), and toadstool is regarded as a synonymous term, since there is, strictly speaking, no distinction between a mushroom and a toadstool.

    Studies of American Fungi. Mushrooms, Edible, Poisonous, etc.

  • The fruiting body of this fungus, what we call the mushroom, is a much more modest 1 to 4 inches by 2 to 6 inches in size.

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  • Conveniently this "mushroom" is ready to "burst" right when unemployment is about to hit 10% and the President is about to ask for another stimulus, because (A) this previous one wasn't enough, or (B) we can't tell if the previous one really failed or not .... depending on what day it is or which news program he is trying to sidestep.

    Bush-era distractions may weigh down Obama's agenda

  • So, just waiting for transplants to mushroom is not a winning strategy.

    Matthew Yglesias » The High-Speed Rail Stimulus?

  • Salsify root and mushroom is a match made in heaven

    Yotam Ottolenghi's mushrooms with salsify and barley recipe

  • A mushroom is a fungus that grows on wet, moist surfaces such as lawns, dead tree trunks, fences and wooded areas.

    Mushrooms

  • The latest results show that lightning-strength jolts of electricity can more than double the yield of certain mushroom species compared with conventional cultivation methods.

    Lightning Makes Mushrooms Multiply | Impact Lab

  • Organizers promise recipes, cultivation and cooking tips, family-friendly crafts, and answers to pressing foraging questions such as “How do I know if a mushroom is poisonous or not,” and “Do I need a permit to harvest mushrooms in Washington state”?

    Mushroom mania, in May

Comments

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  • Hey now, I never said it was bad. That one happens to be a personal favorite of mine. ;-)

    January 22, 2008

  • Yay! I'm glad somebody else watches bad flash videos.

    January 20, 2008

  • Snake! Snake! Oh, it's a snake...

    January 18, 2008

  • Badger, badger, badger, badger, badger, badger, badger, badger.

    MUSHROOM! MUSHROOM!

    January 18, 2008