Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The esophagus.
  • n. The throat.
  • n. Zoology An invagination into the cytoplasm of certain ciliates, used for food intake.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The throat or esophagus.
  • n. The cytopharynx of a ciliate, through which food is ingested.
  • n. The space between the teeth of a saw blade.
  • n. A channel for water.
  • n. A preparatory cut or channel in excavations, of sufficient width for the passage of earth wagons.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The tube by which food and drink are carried from the pharynx to the stomach; the esophagus.
  • n. Something shaped like the food passage, or performing similar functions.
  • n. A channel for water.
  • n. A preparatory cut or channel in excavations, of sufficient width for the passage of earth wagons.
  • n. A concave cut made in the teeth of some saw blades.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The passage in the neck of an animal by which food and drink pass from the mouth to the stomach; the throat; technically, in anatomy, the esophagus.
  • n. Something resembling the throat in shape, position, or functions.
  • n. A preparatory cut or channel in excavations, of sufficient width to admit of the passage of wagons.
  • n. A peculiar concave cut in the teeth of some saw-blades. See gullet-saw.
  • n. A gore, as in a skirt.
  • n. Part of a hood or cowl.
  • n. A piece of armor for the throat or upper part of the body.
  • n. The lower end of a horse-collar about which pass the choke-strap and breast-strap.
  • n. The arch of a bridge.
  • n. A parcel or lot.
  • n. A fish, the pike.
  • To cut or make gullets in: as, to gullet a saw.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the passage between the pharynx and the stomach

Etymologies

Middle English golet, from Old French goulet, from goule, throat, from Latin gula.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Old English golet, Old French goulet, from Latin gula. (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

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  • About us gobblers fork spiced beans down their gullets.
    Joyce, Ulysses, 3

    December 30, 2006