Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The tarsal joint of the hind leg of a digitigrade quadruped, such as a horse, corresponding to the human ankle but bending in the opposite direction.
  • n. A joint in the leg of a domestic fowl similar to the hock of a quadruped.
  • n. A small cut of meat, especially ham, from the front or hind leg directly above the foot.
  • transitive v. To disable by cutting the tendons of the hock; hamstring.
  • n. Chiefly British Rhine wine.
  • transitive v. To pawn: hock a diamond ring.
  • n. The state of being pawned: put the diamonds in hock.
  • n. The state of being in debt: thought we'd never get out of hock.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A Rhenish wine, of a light yellow color, either sparkling or still, from the Hochheim region, but often applied to all Rhenish wines.
  • n. The tarsal joint of a digitigrade quadruped, such as a horse, pig or dog.
  • n. Meat from that part of a food animal.
  • v. To disable by cutting the tendons of the hock; to hamstring; to hough.
  • v. To leave with a pawnbroker as security for a loan.
  • n. Pawn, obligation as collateral for a loan.
  • n. Debt.
  • n. Installment purchase.
  • n. Prison.
  • v. To bother; to pester; to annoy incessantly

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A Rhenish wine, of a light yellow color, either sparkling or still. The name is also given indiscriminately to all Rhenish wines.
  • n.
  • n. The joint in the hind limb of quadrupeds between the leg and shank, or tibia and tarsus, and corresponding to the ankle in man.
  • n. A piece cut by butchers, esp. in pork, from either the front or hind leg, just above the foot.
  • n. The popliteal space; the ham.
  • n. The state of having been pawned; usually preceded by in.
  • n. The state of being in debt.
  • transitive v. To disable by cutting the tendons of the hock; to hamstring; to hough.
  • transitive v. To pawn.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To ham-string; disable by cutting the sinew or tendon of the hock —that is the tendo Achillis.
  • n. The joint on the hind leg of a quadruped between the knee and the fetlock, corresponding to the ankle-joint in man; that part of the leg between the tibia and the cannon-bone, consisting of the ankle-bones more or less completely united.
  • n. In man, the back part of the knee-joint; the ham.
  • n. In the game of faro, the last card remaining in the box after all the others have been dealt.
  • n. Mallow; hollyhock.
  • n. A variant of hack.
  • n. A caterpillar.
  • n. An old game of cards.
  • n. Originally, the wine Hochheimer (which see).
  • n. Any white German wine.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. leave as a guarantee in return for money
  • n. any of several white wines from the Rhine River valley in Germany (`hock' is British usage)
  • v. disable by cutting the hock
  • n. tarsal joint of the hind leg of hoofed mammals; corresponds to the human ankle

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Middle English, from Old English hōh, heel.
Short for obsolete Hockamore, alteration of German Hochheimer, from Hochheim, a town of west-central Germany.
Probably from Dutch hok, prison.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From hockamore, from the name of the German town of Hochheim am Main.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Middle English hoch, hough, hocke, from Old English hōh, from Proto-Germanic *hanhaz (cf. West Frisian hakke, Dutch hak, Low German Hack), from Proto-Indo-European *kenk (cf. Lithuanian kìnka ‘leg, thigh, knee-cap’, kenklė̃ ‘knee-cap’, Sanskrit कङ्काल (kaṅkāla) ‘skeleton’)

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

(Can we verify(+) this etymology?) From Dutch hok ("prison, debt").

Examples

Comments

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  • Those of us who do not pronounce "hawk" the same as "hock" prefer to "hock" a loogie. Were we to "hawk" one, we would wait in vain for buyers.

    May 21, 2012

  • It is a variant of hack, but there are a couple definitions over on hawk that seem to support that word's use when loogie-ing (looging?).

    May 16, 2012

  • The person who recorded the disgusting sound effect was thinking of the word "hawk". Hawk is what one "does to a loogie".

    May 16, 2012

  • love that Chiefly British def!

    July 30, 2010

  • Also, pawning.

    November 10, 2008

  • "I believe I've sprained my hock," wailed Ebenezer. "Left hind leg." And he rebrayed his bray of pain.

    - William Steig, Farmer Palmer's Wagon Ride

    September 29, 2008

  • Must have been in PA. *smirk*

    October 11, 2007

  • I grew up near a street named Hockersville Road, and this is what I always thought of. *distressed*

    October 11, 2007

  • Here it comes...

    October 11, 2007

  • What one does to a loogie

    October 11, 2007