Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A short stocking reaching a point between the ankle and the knee.
  • n. Meteorology A windsock.
  • n. A light shoe worn by comic actors in ancient Greek and Roman plays.
  • n. Comic drama; comedy: "He . . . knew all niceties of the sock and buskin” ( Byron).
  • transitive v. To provide with socks.
  • sock away Informal To put (money) away in a safe place for future use.
  • sock in To close to air traffic: fog that socked in the airport.
  • transitive v. To hit or strike forcefully; punch.
  • intransitive v. To deliver a blow.
  • n. A hard blow or punch.
  • idiom sock it to (someone) Slang To deliver a forceful comment, reprimand, or physical blow to someone else.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A knitted or woven covering for the foot
  • n. A shoe worn by Greco-Roman comedy actors
  • n. A violent blow, punch
  • n. A shortened version of (Internet) sock puppet
  • v. To hit or strike violently
  • v. To deliver a blow

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A plowshare.
  • n. The shoe worn by actors of comedy in ancient Greece and Rome, -- used as a symbol of comedy, or of the comic drama, as distinguished from tragedy, which is symbolized by the buskin.
  • n. A knit or woven covering for the foot and lower leg; a stocking with a short leg.
  • n. A warm inner sole for a shoe.
  • transitive v. To hurl, drive, or strike violently; -- often with it as an object.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To sew up.
  • To throw; especially, to hurl or send with swiftness and violence: as, to sock a ball.
  • To hit hard; pitch into: as, to sock one in the eye.
  • With an impersonal it, to strike a hard blow; give a drubbing: as, sock it to him!
  • n. A light shoe worn by the ancient actors of comedy; hence, comedy, in distinction from tragedy, which is symbolized by the buskin.
  • n. A knitted or woven covering for the foot, shorter than a stocking; a stocking reaching but a short distance above the ankle.
  • n. A sandal, wooden patten, or clog for the feet, worn by the friars called Recollets.
  • n. A plowshare; a movable share slipped over the sole of a plow.
  • n. Same as soke.
  • n. A dialectal form of sog.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. hosiery consisting of a cloth covering for the foot; worn inside the shoe; reaches to between the ankle and the knee
  • v. hit hard
  • n. a truncated cloth cone mounted on a mast; used (e.g., at airports) to show the direction of the wind

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Middle English socke, from Old English socc, a kind of light shoe, from Latin soccus, possibly from Greek sunkhis, sukkhos, Phrygian shoe.
Origin unknown.

Examples

Comments

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  • A ploughshare. A very rare Celtic survival in the Yorkshire dialect, possibly reintroduced via Cumbria by Vikings who had previously settled in Ireland.

    March 3, 2010