Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A loose coatlike outer garment, often worn to protect the clothes while working.
  • transitive v. To clothe in a smock.
  • transitive v. To decorate (fabric) with smocking.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A woman's undergarment; a shift; a chemise.
  • n. A blouse.
  • n. A loose garment worn as protection by a painter, etc.
  • adj. Of or pertaining to a smock; resembling a smock
  • adj. Hence, of or pertaining to a woman.
  • v. To provide with, or clothe in, a smock or a smock frock. Alfred Tennyson.
  • v. To apply smocking.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A woman's under-garment; a shift; a chemise.
  • n. A blouse; a smoock frock.
  • adj. Of or pertaining to a smock; resembling a smock; hence, of or pertaining to a woman.
  • transitive v. To provide with, or clothe in, a smock or a smock frock.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A garment worn by women corresponding to the shirt worn by men: a chemise; a shift.
  • n. A smock-frock.
  • Belonging or relating to women; characteristic of women; female: common in old writers.
  • To provide with or clothe in a smock or smock-frock.
  • To shir or pucker. See smocking.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a loose coverall (coat or frock) reaching down to the ankles
  • v. embellish by sewing in straight lines crossing each other diagonally

Etymologies

Middle English, woman's undergarment, from Old English smoc.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Old English smoc; akin to Old High German smocho, Icelandic smokkr, and from the root of Old English smgan ("to creep"), akin to German schmiegen ("to cling to, press close"). Middle High German smiegen, Icelandic smjga ("to creep through, to put on a garment which has a hole to put the head through"); compare with Lithuanian smukti ("to glide"). See also smug, smuggle. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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