Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The science of diagnosing, treating, or preventing disease and other damage to the body or mind.
  • n. The branch of this science encompassing treatment by drugs, diet, exercise, and other nonsurgical means.
  • n. The practice of medicine.
  • n. An agent, such as a drug, used to treat disease or injury.
  • n. Something that serves as a remedy or corrective: medicine for rebuilding the economy; measures that were harsh medicine.
  • n. Shamanistic practices or beliefs, especially among Native Americans.
  • n. Something, such as a ritual practice or sacred object, believed to control natural or supernatural powers or serve as a preventive or remedy.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A substance which specifically promotes healing when ingested or consumed in some way.
  • n. A treatment or cure.
  • n. The study of the cause, diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of disease or illness.
  • n. The profession of physicians, surgeons and related specialisms; those who practice medicine.
  • n. Ritual Native American magic used (notably by a medicine man) to promote a desired outcome in healing, hunting, warfare etc.
  • n. black magic, superstition.
  • v. To treat with medicine.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The science which relates to the prevention, cure, or alleviation of disease.
  • n. Any substance administered in the treatment of disease; a remedial agent; a medication; a medicament; a remedy; physic.
  • n. A philter or love potion.
  • n. A physician.
  • n.
  • n. Among the North American Indians, any object supposed to give control over natural or magical forces, to act as a protective charm, or to cause healing; also, magical power itself; the potency which a charm, token, or rite is supposed to exert.
  • n. Hence, a similar object or agency among other savages.
  • n. Short for Medicine man.
  • n. Intoxicating liquor; drink.
  • transitive v. To give medicine to; to affect as a medicine does; to remedy; to cure.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A substance used as a remedy for disease; a substance having or supposed to have curative properties; hence, figuratively, anything that has a curative or remedial effect.
  • n. The art of preventing, curing, or alleviating diseases and remedying as far as possible the results of violence and accident.
  • n. Something which is supposed to possess curative, supernatural, or mysterious power; any object used or any ceremony performed as a charm: an English equivalent for terms used among American Indians and other savage tribes.
  • n. A physician.
  • To treat or affect medicinally; work upon or cure by or as if by medicine.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. treat medicinally, treat with medicine
  • n. the branches of medical science that deal with nonsurgical techniques
  • n. the learned profession that is mastered by graduate training in a medical school and that is devoted to preventing or alleviating or curing diseases and injuries
  • n. punishment for one's actions
  • n. (medicine) something that treats or prevents or alleviates the symptoms of disease

Etymologies

Middle English, from Old French, from Latin medicīna, from feminine of medicīnus, of a doctor, from medicus, physician; see medical.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Middle English medicin, from Old French, from Latin medicīna ("the healing art, medicine, a physician's shop, a remedy, medicine"), feminine of medicinus ("of or belonging to physic or surgery, or to a physician or surgeon"), from medicus ("a physician, surgeon"), from medeor ("I heal"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Promoted to Headline (H3) on 8/21/09: On 'death panels,' 'socialized medicine' and other red herrings yahooBuzzArticleHeadline = 'On \'death panels, \' \'socialized medicine\ 'and other red herrings'; yahooBuzzArticleSummary = 'Article: Ain\'t it a shame our so-called liberal media is obsessed with "death panels" of fevered imaginations rather than death panels that exist in the real world, notably in our present health-care system?'

    On 'death panels,' 'socialized medicine' and other red herrings

  • The correlation between pay and performance in medicine is currently low.

    David Cutler on Health Care, Arnold Kling | EconLog | Library of Economics and Liberty

  • The heart of the “market failure” in medicine is the body of mandates by local, county, state, and federal governments.

    Think Progress » Nebraska’s Attorney General Suing To Stop Reform Is Clueless About Existing Federal Law

  • I then log on to the internet which was developed by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Administration and post on freerepublic. com and fox news forums about how SOCIALISM in medicine is BAD because the government can't do anything right.

    Archive 2009-08-01

  • You then log on to the internet (which was developed by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Administration) and post on www. freerepublic.com, www. redstate.com and fox news forums about how SOCIALISM in medicine is BAD because the government can't do anything right.

    Archive 2009-08-01

  • The amount of mental energy it takes to stay current in medicine is enormous, and the more energy I put into writing, the less I had left over for medicine.

    Craig Danner - An interview with author

  • I then log on to the internet which was developed by the defense advanced research projects administration and mastered by private enterprise that allows me to be tracked by the governemnt and post on freerepublic. com and fox news forums about how SOCIALISM in medicine is BAD because the government can't do much right.

    I am a conservative! | My[confined]Space

  • I then log on to the internet which was developed by the defense advanced research projects administration and post on freerepublic. com and fox news forums about how SOCIALISM in medicine is BAD because the government can't do anything right. from TikiHumor. com

    I am a conservative! | My[confined]Space

  • So, to answer your question, being in medicine is helpful, particularly for the novel I chose to write.

    Abraham Verghese - An interview with author

  • Compassion in medicine is now effectively forbidden by law, at least until the bureaucrats approve a billing code for it.

    Making Physicians More Human Is a Noble Goal, but . . .

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