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Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Of or relating to the throat.
  • adj. Having a harsh grating quality, as certain sounds produced in the back of the mouth.
  • adj. Linguistics Velar.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Sounding harsh and throaty.
  • adj. Of, relating to, or connected to the throat.
  • n. A harsh and throaty spoken sound

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Of or pertaining to the throat; formed in the throat; relating to, or characteristic of, a sound formed in the throat.
  • n. A sound formed in the throat; esp., a sound formed by the aid of the back of the tongue, much retracted, and the soft palate; also, a letter representing such a sound.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Of or pertaining to the throat; formed in or as in the throat: as, the guttural (superior thyroid) artery; a guttural sound; guttural speech.
  • n. A sound or combination of sounds pronounced in the throat, or in the back part of the mouth toward the throat, as k; any guttural sound or utterance.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a consonant articulated in the back of the mouth or throat
  • adj. relating to or articulated in the throat
  • adj. like the sounds of frogs and crows

Etymologies

French, from New Latin gutturālis, from Latin guttur, throat.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From New Latin gutturālis, from Latin guttur ("throat") + -ālis. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • The following glossolalic passage, spelled out phonetically, was made from that recording the phonetic symbol “?” refers to a guttural sound made in the back of the esophagus:

    Born to Believe

  • The only diacritical marks here employed are the acute accent for stressed syllables and the apostrophe between two vowels to indicate the glottic closure or interruption of sound (improperly sometimes called a guttural) that prevents the two from coalescing.

    Unwritten Literature of Hawaii The Sacred Songs of the Hula

  • Arabic guttural, which is unknown in the other languages in which Latin roots predominate.

    Handbook of Universal Literature From the Best and Latest Authorities

  • It is not to be doubted, but that in the original pronunciation gh has the force of a consonant deeply guttural, which is still continued among the Scotch.

    A Grammar of the English Tongue

  • "The problem both of these horses had involved a disease called guttural pouch mycosis, or a fungal infection in the guttural pouch," said Herb Maisenbacher, an assistant clinical professor of cardiology at the university's veterinary medical centre.

    Horsetalk.co.nz Headlines

  •   Yet, as I inched closer to the house I became sure that only one person ... or thing ... could make those kind of guttural vocalizations.

    Cookie Monster's Harem in the Sky

  • Swiss, does not consist in articulated sounds, nor is it accompanied by words; but is a simple melody formed by a kind of guttural intonation very closely resembling the tones of a flute.

    The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction Volume 13, No. 377, June 27, 1829

  • And turning to his companion he poured a kind of guttural volley at him, which his comrade answered with a brisk return of heavy verbal fire.

    Tom Slade with the Boys Over There

  • There are birds that send a kind of guttural sound from their throats, such as the cuckoos and occasionally the blue jays.

    Our Bird Comrades

  • "It is a monastery," -- said a man of whom I asked the way, speaking in a curious kind of guttural patois, half French and half Spanish --

    The Life Everlasting; a reality of romance

Comments

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  • Guttural words are great for getting out aggression and anger. Just think of many curse words, especially the big one: the f-word. Though I find "duck" is better, with that hard "d" sound at the beginning. ;-)

    March 6, 2009

  • How nice. WeirdNet writes poetry. Kind of.

    January 8, 2009

  • That's evocative, WeirdNet, but I'm not sure it's entirely helpful.

    January 8, 2009