Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A thin broad piece cut from a larger object: ate a slice of cheese; examined a slice of the diseased lung.
  • n. An often wedge-shaped piece cut from a larger, usually circular object: ordered a slice of pie; shared a slice of pizza.
  • n. A portion or share: a slice of the profits.
  • n. A knife with a broad, thin, flexible blade, used for cutting and serving food.
  • n. A similar implement for spreading printing ink.
  • n. Sports The course of a ball that curves in the direction of the dominant hand of the player propelling it, as to the right of a right-handed player.
  • n. Sports A stroke that causes a ball to follow such a course: a golfer with a bad slice.
  • n. Sports A ball propelled on such a course.
  • n. Sports A stroke, as in tennis, in which the ball is struck with a downward motion with the open face of the racket in order to impart backspin.
  • transitive v. To cut or divide into slices: slice a loaf of bread.
  • transitive v. To cut from a larger piece: slice off a piece of salami.
  • transitive v. To cut through or across with or as if with a knife: The harvester sliced the field.
  • transitive v. To divide into portions or shares; parcel out.
  • transitive v. To spread, work at, or clear away with a bladed tool such as a slice bar.
  • transitive v. Sports To hit (a ball) with a slice.
  • intransitive v. To move like a knife: The destroyer sliced through the water.
  • intransitive v. Sports To hit a ball with a slice.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. That which is thin and broad.
  • n. A thin, broad piece cut off.
  • n. amount
  • n. A piece of pizza.
  • n. A snack consisting of pastry with savoury filling.
  • n. A broad, thin piece of plaster.
  • n. A knife with a thin, broad blade for taking up or serving fish; also, a spatula for spreading anything, as paint or ink.
  • n. A salver, platter, or tray.
  • n. A plate of iron with a handle, forming a kind of chisel, or a spadelike implement, variously proportioned, and used for various purposes, as for stripping the planking from a vessel's side, for cutting blubber from a whale, or for stirring a fire of coals; a slice bar; a peel; a fire shovel.
  • n. One of the wedges by which the cradle and the ship are lifted clear of the building blocks to prepare for launching.
  • n. A removable sliding bottom to galley.
  • n. A shot that (for the right-handed player) curves unintentionally to the right. See fade, hook, draw
  • n. A class of heavy cakes or desserts made in a tray and cut out into squarish slices.
  • n. A section of image taken of an internal organ using MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), CT (computed tomography), or various forms of x-ray.
  • n. A hawk's or falcon's dropping which squirts at an angle other than vertical. (See mute.)
  • v. To cut into slices.
  • v. To hit a shot that slices (travels from left to right for a right-handed player).
  • v. To clear (e.g. a fire, or the grate bars of a furnace) by means of a slice bar.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A thin, broad piece cut off
  • n. That which is thin and broad, like a slice.
  • n. A broad, thin piece of plaster.
  • n. A salver, platter, or tray.
  • n. A knife with a thin, broad blade for taking up or serving fish; also, a spatula for spreading anything, as paint or ink.
  • n. A plate of iron with a handle, forming a kind of chisel, or a spadelike implement, variously proportioned, and used for various purposes, as for stripping the planking from a vessel's side, for cutting blubber from a whale, or for stirring a fire of coals; a slice bar; a peel; a fire shovel.
  • n. One of the wedges by which the cradle and the ship are lifted clear of the building blocks to prepare for launching.
  • n. A removable sliding bottom to galley.
  • transitive v. To cut into thin pieces, or to cut off a thin, broad piece from.
  • transitive v. To cut into parts; to divide.
  • transitive v. To clear by means of a slice bar, as a fire or the grate bars of a furnace.
  • transitive v. To hit (the ball) so that the face of the club draws across the face of the ball and deflects it.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A thin broad piece cut off from something: as, a slice of bread or of bacon: often used figuratively.
  • n. A shiver; a splinter.
  • n. Something thin and broad.
  • n. In printing:
  • n. A small spade-shaped iron tool with which printing-ink is taken out of a tub and conveyed to an ink-trough or -fountain.
  • n. The sliding bottom of a slice-galley.
  • n. A bar used by whalers to strip fish with.
  • n. A tapering piece of plank driven between the timbers of a ship before planking. Also called slicer.
  • n. A wedge driven under the keel of a ship when launching.
  • n. A bar with a chisel or spear-headed end, used for stripping off the sheathing or planking of ships.
  • n. A utensil for turning over meat in the frying-pan and for similar purposes. The form is like that of a trowel, the blade being three or four inches wide, twice as long, and often pierced with holes. Also called turn-over.
  • n. A broad, thin knife, usually of silver, for dividing and serving fish at table. Also called fish-slice.
  • n. A bakers' shovel or peel.
  • n. A salver, platter, or tray.
  • To cut into slices, or relatively broad, thin pieces: as, to slice bread, bacon, or an apple.
  • To remove in the form of a slice: sometimes with off or out: as, to slice off a piece of something.
  • To cut; divide.
  • [In the following passage the word is used interjectionally, with no clear meaning.
  • n.
  • n. A mill or machine for slitting or dividing gems.
  • n. In golf, the side spin imparted to a ball which causes it to curve to the right in the case of a right-handed player, or the reverse in the case of a left-handed player.
  • In golf, to draw the face of the club across (the ball) from right to left in the act of hitting it, the result being that it will travel with a curve toward the right; or the reverse for a left-handed player. W. Park, Jr., Game of Golf, glossary.
  • To break with a bar. Bituminous coal, when burned, fuses and forms a solid mass which must be broken up in this manner.
  • In golf, to cause the ball, when struck with the club, to curve from left to right in the case of a right-handed player, or the reverse in the case of a left-handed player.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. hit a ball and put a spin on it so that it travels in a different direction
  • v. cut into slices
  • n. a spatula for spreading paint or ink
  • v. hit a ball so that it causes a backspin
  • n. a wound made by cutting
  • n. a golf shot that curves to the right for a right-handed golfer
  • v. make a clean cut through
  • n. a share of something
  • n. a thin flat piece cut off of some object
  • n. a serving that has been cut from a larger portion

Etymologies

Middle English, splinter, from Old French esclice, from esclicier, to splinter, of Germanic origin.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Middle English slice, esclice, from Old French esclice, esclis ("a piece split off"), deverbal of esclicer, esclicier ("to splinter, split up"), from Frankish *slitjan (“to split up”), from Proto-Germanic *slitjanan, from Proto-Germanic *slītanan (“to split, tear apart”), from Proto-Indo-European *slaid-, *sled- (“to rend, injure, crumble”). Akin to Old High German sliz, gisliz ("a tear, rip"), Old High German slīzan ("to tear"), Old English slītan ("to split up"). More at slite, slit. (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

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  • A hawk's or falcon's dropping which squirts at an angle other than vertical. --from the definitions.

    February 15, 2013

  • Haha! So would the singular of splice be splouse?

    June 24, 2008

  • Plural of slouse?

    June 21, 2008