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Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The condition or property of being viscous.
  • n. Physics Coefficient of viscosity.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The state of being viscous.
  • n. (physics) A quantity expressing the magnitude of internal friction in a fluid, as measured by the force per unit area resisting uniform flow.
  • n. (psychology) A tendency to prolong interpersonal encounters.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The quality or state of being viscous.
  • n. A property possessed by a viscous fluid, being a resistance to the forces causing a fluid to flow, caused by interactions between the molecules of the fluid and between the fluid and the walls of the conduit through which it moves; also, a measure of such a property.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The state or property of being viscous; the quality of flowing slowly, as pitch or castor-oil. Such liquids are commonly sticky, but this is no part of the viscosity.
  • n. In physics, internal friction, a resistance to tire motion of the molecules of a fluid body among themselves: opposed to mobility.
  • n. A glutinous or viscous body.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. resistance of a liquid to shear forces (and hence to flow)

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The better ones are brown, like a red wine in viscosity, slightly sweet, very tart, with a long aftertaste.

    Meathead Goldwyn: Balsamic Vinegar: Magnificence and Deception

  • Synlube is far too light in viscosity, and no longer in production.

    Technical Q&A with Lennard Zinn: Safe crank removal?

  • So, if you heat honey, the viscosity is less than that of cold honey.

    What’s the Matter?

  • Newton said that viscosity is a function of temperature.

    What’s the Matter?

  • A molasses-like liquid, although not as viscous as the real thing, can be made by slowly boiling 6-8 or so piloncillos in a liter or so of water, until they dissolve and the desired viscosity is achieved.

    Brown sugar

  • - Customer fuel economy benefit: Fewer parasitic losses due to reduced fluid viscosity translates to less internal drag on the system and increases fuel economy.

    Autoblog Green

  • Customer fuel economy benefit: Fewer parasitic losses due to reduced fluid viscosity translates to less internal drag on the system and increases fuel economy.

    The Earth Times Online Newspaper

  • As you practice, it gives you feedback on your progress, not only telling you how fast you're going, and how accurately you type, but it even looks at your "viscosity" - the amount of time you spend hesitating between characters as you type.

    Free Download A Day

  • An alternative way to approach this closure problem would be to run your code with variations in viscosity models and parameter values and pick the set that gave you outputs that were in good agreement with high-entropy functionals (like an average solution state, there’s many ways to get the same answer, and nothing to choose between them) for a particular set of flows, this would be a sort of inverse modeling approach.

    Climate Science and Software Quality | Serendipity

  • Similarly, the liquid’s viscosity is important: Pure water droplets aren’t strong enough to hold together and would break apart, and liquids that are too thick will move too slowly.

    Liquid Drops Defy Gravity, Travel Uphill | Impact Lab

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