period of time love

Definitions

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. an amount of time

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The system appears to have begun with a very simple mechanism that would work satisfactorily for a low-pressure, low-flow hemodynamic system, and to have evolved over a long period of time into the complicated system necessary for humans and other mammals that have a high-pressure cardiovascular system, where leaks must be quickly stopped.

    The Language of God

  • It shall be up to your friend, LaBeau, to render that period of time as brief as practically possible.

    BLAZE OF GLORY

  • Gordon England , who served as deputy defense secretary under both Mr. Rumsfeld and Mr. Gates, said the two men's differing management styles were right for the period of time they served.

    Basic Training: How Gates Grew

  • CHANGEOVER: the period of time between innings when the teams switch sides.

    BLASTIN’ THE BLUES

  • Throughout the brief period of time in which she remained present, Michelle grunted loudly and hit herself in the face.

    The Panic Virus

  • Like most of the Mexican girls and gay boys I knew, I went through a vicious, life-consuming Morrissey phase in high school, one that for a period of time made me hate the queen of England and Margaret Thatcher more than I hated the Los Angeles Police Department.

    The Madonnas of Echo Park

  • Psychologist Mihaly Csikszentmihályi identifies flow as a special state of mind in which there is total absorption for a period of time in a given activity.

    The Time Paradox

  • Similar to the Forest of Repose, the aim of the fund, said Mr. Ando, is to prolong the period of time that people will maintain awareness and attention for the disaster victims.

    Building Anew Out of Tsunami's Rubble

  • Overall, maintaining high rates ofaverage growth over a long period of time is very difficult if not impossible.

    Creating Wealth

  • "God decreed that fifteen years should be added to Hezekiah's life; this made him neither careless of his health, nor negligent of his food; he said not, 'Though I run into the fire, or into the water, or drink poison, I shall nevertheless live so long'; but natural providence, in the due use of means co-wrought so as to bring him on to that period of time pre-ordained by him."

    The Reformed Doctrine of Predestination

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