Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A nobleman ranking below a duke and above an earl or a count.
  • n. Used as a title for such a nobleman.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A nobleman in England, France, and Germany, of a rank next below that of duke, but above a count. Originally, the marquis was an officer whose duty was to guard the marches or frontiers of the kingdom. The office has ceased, and the name is now a mere title conferred by patent.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A nobleman in England, France, and Germany, of a rank next below that of duke. Originally, the marquis was an officer whose duty was to guard the marches or frontiers of the kingdom. The office has ceased, and the name is now a mere title conferred by patent.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In Great Britain and France, and in other countries where corresponding titles exist, a nobleman whose rank is intermediate between that of an earl or count and that of a duke.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. nobleman (in various countries) ranking above a count
  • n. humorist who wrote about the imaginary life of cockroaches (1878-1937)

Etymologies

Middle English marques, from Old French marchis, marquis, from marche, border country, of Germanic origin; see merg- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
French: marquis; Old French: markis, marchis; Late Latin: marchensis; Old High German: marcha. Frankish *marka, from Proto-Germanic *markō, from Proto-Indo-European *mereg- (“edge, boundary”). (Wiktionary)

Examples

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.