Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A place on a waterway with facilities for loading and unloading ships.
  • n. A city or town on a waterway with such facilities.
  • n. The waterfront district of a city.
  • n. A place along a coast that gives ships and boats protection from storms and rough water; a harbor.
  • n. A port of entry.
  • n. The left-hand side of a ship or aircraft facing forward. Also called larboard.
  • adj. Of, relating to, or on the port.
  • transitive v. To turn (a craft) or make a shift to the port side: port the helm; ported sharply to avoid a shoal.
  • n. Nautical An opening in a ship's side providing access to the interior.
  • n. Nautical A porthole.
  • n. Archaic Nautical A cover for a porthole.
  • n. An opening, as in a cylinder or valve face, for the passage of steam or fluid.
  • n. A hole in an armored vehicle or a fortified structure for viewing or for firing weapons.
  • n. An entrance to or exit from a data network.
  • n. A connection point for a peripheral device.
  • n. Scots A gateway or portal, as to a town.
  • transitive v. Computer Science To modify (software) for use on a different machine or platform.
  • n. A rich sweet fortified wine.
  • transitive v. To hold or carry (a weapon) diagonally across the body, with the muzzle or blade near the left shoulder.
  • n. The position of a rifle or other weapon when ported.
  • n. The manner in which one carries oneself; bearing.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A place on the coast at which ships can shelter, or dock to load and unload cargo or passengers.
  • n. A town or city containing such a place.
  • n. The left-hand side of a vessel, including aircraft, when one is facing the front. Port does not change based on the orientation of the person aboard the craft.
  • adj. Of or relating to port, the left-hand side of a vessel.
  • v. To turn or put to the left or larboard side of a ship; said of the helm.
  • n. An entryway or gate.
  • n. An opening or doorway in the side of a ship, especially for boarding or loading; an embrasure through which a cannon may be discharged; a porthole.
  • n. A space between two stones wide enough for a delivered stone or bowl to pass through.
  • n. An opening where a connection (such as a pipe) is made.
  • n. A logical or physical construct in and from which data are transferred. Computer port (hardware) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia:Computer port (hardware)
  • n. A female connector of an electronic device, into which a cable's male connector can be inserted.
  • v. To carry, bear, or transport. See porter.
  • v. To hold or carry (a weapon) with both hands so that it lays diagonally across the front of the body, with the barrel or similar part near the left shoulder and the right hand grasping the small of the stock; or, to throw (the weapon) into this position on command.
  • v. To adapt, modify, or create a new version of, a program so that it works on a different platform; to adapt a console video game title to be sold and played on another brand of console. Porting (computing) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia:Porting
  • v. To carry or transfer an existing telephone number from one telephone service provider to another.
  • n. Something used to carry a thing, especially a frame for wicks in candle-making.
  • n. The manner in which a person carries himself; bearing; deportment; carriage. See also portance.
  • n. The position of a weapon when ported; a rifle position executed by throwing the weapon diagonally across the front of the body, with the right hand grasping the small of the stock and the barrel sloping upward and crossing the point of the left shoulder.
  • n. A program that has been adapted, modified, or recoded so that it works on a different platform from the one for which it was created; the act of this adapting.
  • n. A set of files used to build and install a binary executable file from the source code of an application.
  • n. A type of very sweet fortified wine, mostly dark red, traditionally made in Portugal.
  • n. A schoolbag or suitcase.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A dark red or purple astringent wine made in Portugal. It contains a large percentage of alcohol.
  • n. A place where ships may ride secure from storms; a sheltered inlet, bay, or cove; a harbor; a haven. Used also figuratively.
  • n. In law and commercial usage, a harbor where vessels are admitted to discharge and receive cargoes, from whence they depart and where they finish their voyages.
  • n. A passageway; an opening or entrance to an inclosed place; a gate; a door; a portal.
  • n. An opening in the side of a vessel; an embrasure through which cannon may be discharged; a porthole; also, the shutters which close such an opening.
  • n. A passageway in a machine, through which a fluid, as steam, water, etc., may pass, as from a valve to the interior of the cylinder of a steam engine; an opening in a valve seat, or valve face.
  • transitive v. To carry; to bear; to transport.
  • transitive v. To throw, as a musket, diagonally across the body, with the lock in front, the right hand grasping the small of the stock, and the barrel sloping upward and crossing the point of the left shoulder.
  • n. The manner in which a person bears himself; deportment; carriage; bearing; demeanor; hence, manner or style of living.
  • n. The larboard or left side of a ship (looking from the stern toward the bow). See note under larboard. Also used adjectively.
  • transitive v. To turn or put to the left or larboard side of a ship; -- said of the helm, and used chiefly in the imperative, as a command.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A bay, cove, inlet, or recess of the sea, or of a lake or the mouth of a river, where vessels can be protected from storms; a harbor or haven, whether natural or artificial.
  • n. A place where there is a constant resort of vessels for the purpose of loading and unloading; specifically, in law, a place where persons and merchandise are allowed to pass into and out of the realm and at which customs officers are stationed for the purpose of inspecting or appraising imported goods. In this sense a port may exist on the frontier, where the foreign communication is by land.
  • To carry or bring into port.
  • n. A gate; an entrance; a portal; specifically, the gate of a town or fortress.
  • n. An opening in the side of a ship; specifically, an embrasure in the side of a ship of war, through which cannon are pointed; a port-hole; also, the covering or shutter of such an opening.
  • n. In heraldry, the door or gate of a castle, used as a bearing.
  • n. An aperture for the passage of Steam, air, water, etc.
  • n. In harness, a curved piece of metal used as a mouthpiece in some forms of bit. Such a bit is called a port-bit.
  • n. In armor, the socket or bucket in which the butt of the lance was set when held upright: it was secured to the saddle or stirrup.
  • To furnish with doors or gates.
  • To bear; carry; convey.
  • To carry in military fashion; carry (a weapon, as a rifle) with both hands in a slanting direction upward and toward the left, crossing the body in front, in execution of the military command “Portarms,” or, as now given, “Arms port.”
  • n. Bearing; carriage; demeanor; air; mien: as, the port of a gentleman.
  • n. State: style; establishment; retinue.
  • n. Synonyms Deportment, address.
  • Nautical, to turn or shift to the left or larboard side of a ship: as, to port the helm (that is, to shift the tiller over to the port or left side).
  • Nautical, to turn or shift to the left or larboard, as a ship.
  • n. Nautical, the larboard or left side of a ship (when one is looking forward): as, “the ship heels to port”; “hard a port.”
  • n. A wine of Portugal, named from Oporto (see above).
  • n. Martial music adapted to the bagpipes.
  • n. An abbreviation of Portugal and Portuguese.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. carry, bear, convey, or bring
  • v. drink port
  • v. land at or reach a port
  • n. an opening (in a wall or ship or armored vehicle) for firing through
  • adj. located on the left side of a ship or aircraft
  • v. turn or go to the port or left side, of a ship
  • v. bring to port
  • v. put or turn on the left side, of a ship
  • v. modify (software) for use on a different machine or platform
  • v. carry or hold with both hands diagonally across the body, especially of weapons
  • n. the left side of a ship or aircraft to someone who is aboard and facing the bow or nose
  • n. sweet dark-red dessert wine originally from Portugal
  • n. (computer science) computer circuit consisting of the hardware and associated circuitry that links one device with another (especially a computer and a hard disk drive or other peripherals)
  • n. a place (seaport or airport) where people and merchandise can enter or leave a country

Etymologies

Middle English, from Old English, from Latin portus; see per-2 in Indo-European roots.
Probably from port side, from port1.
Middle English, gate, porthole, from Old French porte, gate, from Latin porta; see per-2 in Indo-European roots.
After Oporto .
French porter, to carry, from Old French, from Latin portāre; see per-2 in Indo-European roots. N., Middle English porte, from Old French port, from porter, to carry.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
Old English port, from Latin portus ("port, harbour"). (Wiktionary)
From Latin porta ("passage, gate"), reinforced in Middle English, from Old French porte. (Wiktionary)
From Old French porter, from Latin portare ("carry"). Akin to transport, portable. (Wiktionary)
Named from Portuguese Oporto, a city in Portugal from whence the wines were originally shipped. (Wiktionary)
Abbreviation of portmanteau. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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