Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A thin, cushionlike mass of soft material used to fill, to give shape, or to protect against jarring, scraping, or other injury.
  • n. A flexible saddle without a frame.
  • n. An ink-soaked cushion used to ink a rubber stamp.
  • n. A number of sheets of paper of the same size stacked one on top of the other and glued together at one end; a tablet.
  • n. The broad floating leaf of an aquatic plant such as the water lily.
  • n. The flattened fleshy stem of a cactus such as certain varieties of prickly pear. Also called paddle1.
  • n. The cushionlike flesh on the underpart of the toes and feet of many animals.
  • n. The foot of such an animal.
  • n. The fleshy underside of the end of a finger or toe.
  • n. A launch pad.
  • n. A helipad.
  • n. A keypad.
  • n. Slang One's apartment or room.
  • transitive v. To line or stuff with soft material.
  • transitive v. To lengthen or increase, especially with extraneous or false information: pad a lecture with jokes; pad an expense account.
  • idiom on the pad Slang Taking bribes.
  • intransitive v. To go about on foot.
  • intransitive v. To move or walk about almost inaudibly.
  • transitive v. To go along (a route) on foot: padding the long road into town.
  • n. A muffled sound resembling that of soft footsteps.
  • n. A horse with a plodding gait.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A flattened mass of anything soft, to sit or lie on.
  • n. A cushion used as a saddle without a tree or frame.
  • n. A soft, or small, cushion.
  • n. A cushion-like thickening of the skin on the under side of the toes of animals.
  • n. An animal's foot or paw.
  • n. Any cushion-like part of the human body, especially the ends of the fingers.
  • n. A stuffed guard or protection, especially one worn on the legs of horses to prevent bruising.
  • n. A soft bag or cushion to relieve pressure, support a part, etc.
  • n. A sanitary napkin.
  • n. A floating leaf of a water lily or similar plant.
  • n. a batsman's leg pad that protects it from damage when hit by the ball
  • n. A kind of cushion for writing upon, or for blotting, especially one formed of many flat sheets of writing paper; now especially such a block of paper sheets as used to write on.
  • n. A panel or strip of material designed to be sensitive to pressure or touch.
  • n. A keypad.
  • n. A flat surface or area from which a helicopter or other aircraft may land or be launched.
  • n. An electrical extension cord with a multi-port socket one end: "trip cord"
  • n. The effect produced by sustained lower reed notes in a musical piece, most common in blues music.
  • n. A synthesizer instrument sound used for sustained background sounds.
  • n. A bed.
  • n. A place of residence.
  • n. A random key (originally written on a disposable pad) of the same length as the plaintext.
  • n. A mousepad.
  • v. To stuff.
  • v. To furnish with a pad or padding.
  • v. To fill or lengthen (a story, one's importance, etc.).
  • v. To imbue uniformly with a mordant.
  • v. to deliberately play the ball with the leg pad instead of the bat.
  • n. A toad.
  • n. A footpath, particularly one unformed or umaintained; a road or track. See footpad.
  • n. An easy-paced horse; a padnag.
  • n. A robber that infests the road on foot; a highwayman or footpad.
  • n. A type of wickerwork basket, especially as used as a measure of fish or other goods.
  • interj. Indicating a soft flat sound, as of bare footsteps.
  • n. The sound of soft footsteps, or a similar noise made by an animal etc.
  • v. To travel along (a road, path etc.).
  • v. To travel on foot.
  • v. To wear a path by walking.
  • v. To walk softly, quietly or steadily, especially without shoes.
  • v. To practise highway robbery.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A footpath; a road.
  • n. An easy-paced horse; a padnag.
  • n. A robber that infests the road on foot; a highwayman; -- usually called a footpad.
  • n. The act of robbing on the highway.
  • n. A soft, or small, cushion; a mass of anything soft; stuffing.
  • n. A kind of cushion for writing upon, or for blotting; esp., one formed of many flat sheets of writing paper, or layers of blotting paper; a block of paper.
  • n. A cushion used as a saddle without a tree or frame.
  • n. A stuffed guard or protection; esp., one worn on the legs of horses to prevent bruising.
  • n. A cushionlike thickening of the skin one the under side of the toes of animals.
  • n. A floating leaf of a water lily or similar plant.
  • n. A soft bag or cushion to relieve pressure, support a part, etc.
  • n. A piece of timber fixed on a beam to fit the curve of the deck.
  • n. A measure for fish; ; a basket of soles.
  • n. A dwelling place, usually an apartment; one's living quarters.
  • n. A sum of money paid as a bribe to police officers, shared among them
  • intransitive v. To travel heavily or slowly.
  • intransitive v. To rob on foot.
  • intransitive v. To wear a path by walking.
  • transitive v. To travel upon foot; to tread.
  • transitive v. To stuff; to furnish with a pad or padding.
  • transitive v. To imbue uniformly with a mordant.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To travel on foot; tramp slowly or wearily along; trudge or jog along.
  • To travel on foot over or along; proceed on foot through; journey slowly, steadily, or wearily along.
  • To tread or beat down; make smooth and level by treading: as, to pad a path.
  • To stuff or furnish with a pad or padding: often with out.
  • To expand by the insertion of extraneous or needless matter, or the use of unnecessary words: as, to pad an article in a newspaper; to pad out a page in a book.
  • In calico-printing, to impregnate (the cotton cloth to be printed) with a mordant. It is done in a machine called a padding-machine (which see).
  • To glue the edges of (sheets of paper) together, so as to form a pad.
  • In mech., to puncture with numerous fine holes, as the end of a pipe, or the rose on the end of a nozle.
  • To be a footpad, or highway robber; frequent roads or highways in order to rob.
  • To move with the soft thud of a bare foot striking the ground.
  • In leather-making, to apply a heavy coating of solution to.
  • In India, to pack on an elephant's pad.
  • n. A path; a footpath; a road.
  • n. A toad; a frog.
  • n. A soft cushion, or something of the nature of a cushion, or a stuffed part, as of a garment, a saddle, etc., used to fill up a hollow, to relieve pressure, or as a protection.
  • n. Specifically— In cricket, a wadded guard worn to protect the leg by a batsman or wicket-keeper.
  • n. In embroidery, a small qnantity of fibrous material, such as raw cotton or silk, used for raising parts of a pattern, the stitch covering it closely.
  • n. One of the large, fleshy, thick-skinned protuberances of the sole of the foot of various quadrupeds, as the dog or fox; hence, specifically, the foot of a fox.
  • n. One of the tylari of a bird's foot; one of the cushion-like enlargements on the under side of a bird's toes. Compare heel-pad and pterna.
  • n. In anatomy, the splenium of the corpus callosum. See splenium.
  • n. In entomology, a projecting part of the body covered only with a membrane or semi-chitinous sheath: generally used in composition: as, the wing-pads of a pupa; the foot-pads or cushions on the tarsi.
  • n. A cushion used as a saddle; a saddle of leather and padding, without any tree, such as are used by country market-women or by equestrian performers in a circus.
  • n. A number of sheets of writing-, drawing-, or blotting-paper held together by glue at one or more edges, forming a tablet from which the sheets can be removed singly as used: as, a writing-pad; a blotting-pad.
  • n. A bundle; bale; pack: as, a pad of wool; a pad of yarn. Among fish-dealers a pad of mackerel is 60 (sometimes 120) fish.
  • n. The handle of some tools: as, the pad of a keyhole-saw.
  • n. In ship-building, a piece laid over a ship's beam to give the camber.
  • n. plural Thick ribbons, double-faced and watered, much in use at certain times for watch-guards. Compare Petersham ribbon, under ribbon.
  • n. A pannier; a basket.
  • n. A road-horse; a horse for riding on the road, as distinguished from a hunter or a work-horse, etc.; a roadster.
  • n. A robber; a footpad.
  • n. [pad, verb] A dull sound, as of footsteps.
  • n. A large floating disk-like leaf-blade, chiefly that of the water-lilies: used mostly in the combination lily-pad; so called from its suggesting a cushion. Also pad-leaf.
  • n. Specifically, the pile of tobacco-leaf segments formed by booking, that is, laying smoothly one above another for use in cigar-making.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a block of absorbent material saturated with ink; used to transfer ink evenly to a rubber stamp
  • n. a platform from which rockets or space craft are launched
  • n. temporary living quarters
  • v. add padding to
  • n. the fleshy cushion-like underside of an animal's foot or of a human's finger
  • v. line or stuff with soft material
  • n. a number of sheets of paper fastened together along one edge
  • n. a flat mass of soft material used for protection, stuffing, or comfort
  • n. the large floating leaf of an aquatic plant (as the water lily)
  • v. add details to
  • v. walk heavily and firmly, as when weary, or through mud

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Origin unknown.
Perhaps from Middle Dutch paden, tread a path, from pad, pat, path; see pent- in Indo-European roots.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

1554, "bundle of straw to lie on", possibly, from Middle Low German or Dutch pad ("sole of the foot").

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Precise etymology unknown; probably existed (though unattested) in Old English. Possibly cognate with Dutch pad, dialectal German Padde, Swedish padda, Danish padde, and possibly ancestor to the pad-like English paddle.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Dutch pad or Middle Low German pat ("path").

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Perhaps an alteration of ped.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Probably partly from Middle Low German, partly imitative.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Probably imitative, perhaps related to or influenced by Etymology 5, above.

Examples

Comments

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  • "pad" in Hungarian means: bench / desk

    August 1, 2012

  • "21. In calico-printing, to impregnate (the cotton cloth to be printed) with a mordant. It is done in a machine called a padding-machine (which see)."

    --Century Dictionary

    September 16, 2010

  • Cricket jargon - a protective guard worn on the leg. Batsmen in modern times also use thigh-pads and chest-pads as protection.

    November 30, 2007