Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The state of being in leaf.
  • n. Decoration with sculpted or painted foliage.
  • n. Architecture Decoration of an opening with cusps and foils, as in Gothic tracery.
  • n. The act, process, or product of forming metal into thin leaf or foil.
  • n. The act or process of coating glass with metal foil.
  • n. The process of numbering consecutively the leaves of a book or manuscript.
  • n. The leaves so numbered.
  • n. Geology The layered structure common to metamorphic rocks.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The process of forming into a leaf or leaves.
  • n. The manner in which the young leaves are disposed within the bud.
  • n. The act of beating a metal into a thin plate, leaf, foil, or lamina.
  • n. The act of coating with an amalgam of tin foil and quicksilver, as in making looking-glasses.
  • n. The enrichment of an opening by means of foils, arranged in trefoils, quatrefoils, etc.; also, one of the ornaments.
  • n. The property, possessed by some crystalline rocks, of dividing into plates or slabs, which is due to the cleavage structure of one of the constituents, as mica or hornblende. It may sometimes include slaty structure or cleavage, though the latter is usually independent of any mineral constituent, and transverse to the bedding, it having been produced by pressure.
  • n. A set of submanifolds of a given manifold, each of which is of lower dimension than it, but which, taken together, are coextensive with it.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The process of forming into a leaf or leaves.
  • n. The manner in which the young leaves are dispo´┐Żed within the bud.
  • n. The act of beating a metal into a thin plate, leaf, foil, or lamina.
  • n. The act of coating with an amalgam of tin foil and quicksilver, as in making looking-glasses.
  • n. The enrichment of an opening by means of foils, arranged in trefoils, quatrefoils, etc.; also, one of the ornaments. See Tracery.
  • n. The property, possessed by some crystalline rocks, of dividing into plates or slabs, which is due to the cleavage structure of one of the constituents, as mica or hornblende. It may sometimes include slaty structure or cleavage, though the latter is usually independent of any mineral constituent, and transverse to the bedding, it having been produced by pressure.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The leafing of plants; vernation; the disposition of the nascent leaves within the bud; also, leafage; foliage.
  • n. A leaf or scale.
  • n. The act of beating a metal into a thin plate, leaf, or foil.
  • n. The act or operation of spreading foil over the surface of a piece of glass to form a mirror.
  • n. The state of being foliaceous or foliated.
  • n. In geology, an arrangement of the constituent minerals of a rock in thinly lamellar or often scale-like forms, the result of which is that the mass splits easily in a certain definite direction.
  • n. In architecture, enrichment with ornamental cusps or groups of cusps, as in the tracery of medieval windows; foils collectively; feathering.
  • n. Arrangement by leaves; specifically, a numbering of the leaves of a book instead of the pages.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the work of coating glass with metal foil
  • n. the production of foil by cutting or beating metal into thin leaves
  • n. (geology) the arrangement of leaflike layers in a rock
  • n. (botany) the process of forming leaves
  • n. (architecture) leaf-like architectural ornament

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Yet given that you have made a choice of foliation you then put a flag at a point.

    Dark Matter: Still Dark.

  • That picture of things only comes about if one looks at the spacetime as a foliation of spatial surfaces linked by lapse and shift functions.

    Does Space Expand?

  • The spatial portion of the metric is well known and the solution involves spatial surfaces in a foliation where volumes contain there in are variable.

    Does Space Expand?

  • The compaction foliation and jointing in the red-gray and reddish ash-flow tuff to the right is roughly parallel to jointing in the granitic rock on the left, and roughly parallel to the contact.

    Geology on the Road: Highway 50 #1

  • I thought while looking at this outcrop the last time I stopped, that there might be some faulting or shearing between the whitish layer and the upper, densest part of the welded tuff the reddish gray, bouldery, hard-looking stuff with possible shearing taken up in part in the brighter reddish zone, in which you can still see some compaction foliation.

    Geology on the Road: Highway 50 #1

  • In this rock, you get the recrystallization and foliation of quartz, feldspars, micas, and amphiboles into alternating light - and dark-colored bands.

    Metamorphic rock

  • This rock is characterized by the foliation (Figure 1) of its mineral grains which causes it to have cleavage that is parallel.

    Metamorphic rock

  • One way to do this is by means of additional Lorentz invariant dynamical structure, for example a suitable time-like 4-vector field, that permits the definition of a foliation of space-time into space-like hypersurfaces providing a Lorentz invariant notion of "evolving configuration" and along which nonlocal effects are transmitted.

    Bohmian Mechanics

  • This foliation represents the idea of causality (in other circumstances the absence of timelike loops).

    The Landscape - For Real This Time

  • Light descending in floods dissolved the separate foliation into one green mound.

    The Waves

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.

  • I could see it. Foliage and decomposition make me think of forests--and forests are good at cleaning the air.

    February 7, 2013

  • Sounds like a fancy air filter, ruzuzu.

    February 7, 2013

  • "In mathematics, a foliation is a geometric device used to study manifolds, consisting of an integrable subbundle of the tangent bundle. A foliation looks locally like a decomposition of the manifold as a union of parallel submanifolds of smaller dimension."

    -- http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Foliation&oldid=526000556

    February 7, 2013